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What is the difference between xtype and alias used in Sencha? They're both seem to be used as shorthand in different places.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is really confusing, even Sencha Touch developers team does not have a common opinion.

As far as I know, they design this merely for performance. Alias appears earlier than xtype, they create xtype config because if we don't have to parse the string to get the xtype like before, it's faster.

Anyway, things like xtype, ptype, ltype or most common, alias should be unified and clarified in next releases, said the dev team.

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Looks like they did not :( –  Fawar Jul 9 '13 at 14:46
    
I used to work for Sencha, I can assure you that the Sencha Touch team has never said this. The difference between alias and xtype is quite clear, and is reflected in the documentation. –  Patrick Chu May 2 at 16:18
    
it's been long since this answer was posted. I didn't even remember which thread I joined on sencha forum, but it MIGHT be this one: sencha.com/forum/… –  Thiem Nguyen May 2 at 16:49

When you use "alias" to declare an xtype, you have to preface it with "widget".

Example:

{
   ...
   alias: 'widget.mycomponent'
   ...
}

When you use the xtype property, you can leave the "widget." part off, because that part is assumed:

Example:

{
   ...
   xtype: 'mycomponent'
   ...
}

The reason for the two different properties is because you can declare aliases of things other than "widget", like alias: 'layout.card', which is used in the framework. However, for end-user code that reference view objects, you'll probably be using either

alias: 'widget.mycomponent'

or

xtype: 'mycomponent'
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