Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For my ASP.NET MVC3 (new) development, I don't want to create a dependency on MvcContrib TestHelper (and thus Rhino Mocks) unless it is providing significant value. So I'm seeking to understand the current status of this helper.

The documentation says that TestHelper produces fakes for the following controller dependencies:

  • HttpContext
  • HttpRequest
  • HttpResponse
  • HttpSession
  • Form
  • TempData
  • QueryString
  • ApplicationPath
  • PathInfo

For MVC1 and MVC2 I can see why this was so helpful. But MVC3 started to introduce improved test "seams" which may have made TestHelper less pertinent. For example, the MVC3 Request and Response controller properties were designed specifically to be isolateable/injectable versions of HttpRequest and HttpResponse.

As I'm still exploring testability advancements in MVC3, I'd like to know how many of the other dependencies listed above have received improved isolation (or injectability) in MVC3. I'd also love to see samples of code showing what it looks like in MVC3 to create tests with fakes (stubs / mocks) for the above dependencies WITH and WITHOUT using TestHelper.

If the differences in test-writing with and without TestHelper are sufficiently marginal, then I'd prefer to forego TestHelper...which means I am then free to choose whatever isolation framework I like (MOQ or NSubstitute).

Ultimately I would be surprised to learn the MVC3 release had taken specific improved testability steps for HttpRequest and HttpResponse, but not for the other above listed dependency issues. I'm hoping someone can give a break-down of how the above items are isolated without using TestHelper.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

But MVC3 started to introduce improved test "seams" which may have made TestHelper less pertinent. For example, the MVC3 Request and Response controller properties were designed specifically to be isolateable/injectable versions of HttpRequest and HttpResponse.

MVC didn't introduce absolutely anything new in respect to the objects you have listed in your question in terms of unit testabaility. They were abstractions in ASP.NET MVC 1 and 2 and are abstractions in ASP.NET MVC 3. This allows you to unit test your controller actions and code that depends on them in isolation. But in order to do that you need to mock those dependencies. That's where a mocking framework comes into play. Rhino Mocks is just one possible framework. MVCContrib.TestHelper provides a really nice and fluent syntax to unit test controller actions. Personally I use it all the time. It really makes the unit tests more readable and avoids cluttering them with all kind of plumbing, mocking and infrastructure code.

Check this unit test for example: https://github.com/darind/samplemvc/blob/master/tests/SampleMvc.Web.Tests/Controllers/UsersControllerTests.cs

ASP.NET MVC 3 introduced a dependency resolver and providers which allows you to inject dependencies into many other parts of the framework other than simple controllers and thus unit test those parts which previously were difficult. For example action filters.

But in terms of the actual unit test it doesn't change anything:

  1. you create a mock to represent some object that the subject under test depends upon and that you can control in your unit test
  2. you define expectations on the mocked object
  3. you call the actual method you are testing
  4. you assert on the results
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not against using an isolation framework. My principle concern is that MvcContrib TestHelper takes away my framework choice. I'm forced to use Rhino Mocks even if, for example, I prefer MOQ. –  Brent Arias Apr 13 '12 at 17:50
    
@BrentArias, yes, it requires Rhino Mocks. If you prefer Moq go ahead and mock all the dependencies manually. You will still be able to do unit tests. I just like the nice syntax of MvcContrib.TestHelper and all the extension methods it provides. But you could of course achieve the same with Moq if you prefer. You will just have to work a little more. There are whole plethora of articles on the web illustrating how to mock those common abstractions using Moq (HttpContextBase, HttpRequestBase, HttpResponseBase, ...). –  Darin Dimitrov Apr 13 '12 at 17:52
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.