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Here's an example of my problem:

HTML

<p><a class="clickme" href="#">I would like to say:</a></p>

jQuery

$("a.clickme").click(function() {
    $('p').append('<div><a href="#" id="say-hello">Hello</a></div>');
});

$("#say-hello").click(function(){
    alert('test hello');
});

Here's a fiddle with the example code: http://jsfiddle.net/johnmorris/2UVYd/2/

The first click function fires just fine. But, the alert (or any other function) will not fire on the newly appended elements. I basically understand that the appended element didn't exist on page load, so jQuery doesn't "see" it... thus, the second click function not firing.

I'm just wondering if there's a way around that. And, if so, what is it. I can't seem to get this figured out.

share|improve this question
1  
One other thing to be cognizant of: if clicked multiple times, your a is appending multiple elements with the same id. This is against the HTML spec, as ids are supposed to be unique within a document. I would suggest using class instead. – jmoerdyk Apr 13 '12 at 17:54
    
Thanks! My actual code does append a class. I posted the example, because my actual code is uber-long and convoluted. But, I have thought of that. Thanks again! :) – John Morris Apr 13 '12 at 18:13
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to wait to assign the event until the element exists:

$("a.clickme").click(function() {
    $('p').append('<div><a href="#" id="say-hello">Hello</a></div>');
    $("#say-hello").click(function(){
        alert('test hello');
    });
});

Notice that the click assignment for the newly created anchor is INSIDE the other click callback.

@Vega is using another technique called "delegation" where you assign the click for "say-hello" to the p instead of the anchor itself. When the anchor is clicked the event "bubbles" up through the DOM and is gets caught by the event listener on the p tag. This works correctly, but this may not be the right time for delegation. Delegation is usually used when you have a collection of items inside of a common container (e.g. LIs in a UL) that all have to handle the same event. If you just have one "say-hello" then I would recommend not using delegation. ​

If you need to be able to click the button multiple times and have it inserted multiple times then delegation might be the right option (but you'll need to stop using a hard-coded ID). Or... you could do it this way:

$("a.clickme").click(function() {
    $('<div><a href="#" class="say-hello">Hello</a></div>').find('.say-hello')
            .click(function(){
                alert('test hello');
            })
        .end()
        .appendTo('p');
});

This code actually digs into the newly created elements and attaches the event before appending to the DOM. (Oh, and notice that I'm using a className rather than an id for "say-hello".)

share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me. Actually, all of them "worked" but this is what I went with. Thanks for the help! You guys are freakin' awesome! :) – John Morris Apr 13 '12 at 18:08

Your code doesn't work because $("#say-hello") doesn't exist in dom when you bind it to click handler.

However you can use .on like in below syntax which will look for element with ID say-hello that will be later added to 'p',

DEMO

  $("p").on('click', '#say-hello', function(){
    alert('test hello');
  })
share|improve this answer
    
Depending on the use case, delegation might be the wrong choice. No need to delegate if there is only one element... – Prestaul Apr 13 '12 at 17:52
    
Thanks! I ended up going with @Prestaul code, but yours worked just fine, as well. Thanks for the help! – John Morris Apr 13 '12 at 18:09

You could also try this, which avoids the issue of creating multiple DOM elements with the same ID. It gives each a random ID by appending a random number between 1 and 100 to the ID name:

<script>
    $("a.clickme").click(function() {
        var newId = "say-hello" + Math.floor((Math.random()*100)+1);
        $('p').append('<div><a href="#" id="' + newId +'">Hello</a></div>');

        $("#"+newId).click(function(){
            alert('test hello');
        })
    });

</script>

Note that I placed the addition of a click handler within the existing <a> click.

Randoms don't guarantee no conflict, but make the range big enough and it can be a safe assumption. Or just use a counter to ensure there's not ID conflict.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help! I may end up using the random number idea, but for now the code by @Prestaul seemed to work best. Thanks again! – John Morris Apr 13 '12 at 18:10
jQuery(".your_append_element_class').live('click',function() {
    // Your Code goes here..
});
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