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I have two files

$cat file 1
Index1 annotation1
abcd
Index2 annotation2
efgh
Index3 annotation3
hijk
Index4 annotation4
lmno
Index5 annotation5
pqrs
…
$cat file2
Index1
Index3
Index5

What I want to get is the list of lines from file 1 and the line afterward of each line retrieved like following.

Index1 annotation1
abcd
Index3 annotation3
hijk
Index5 annotation5
pqrs

My current solution is to use grep and its 'file' flag grep -A 1 --file="file2" file1 | awk '!/--/'

But I was wondering if there is more elegant solutions to this. The current solution takes a long time when the files are huge

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;
use autodie;

my %to_index;

my ($annotations_file, $index_file) = @ARGV;

open my $index, '<', $index_file;

while (my $line = <$index>) {
    next unless $line =~ /\S/;
    chomp $line;
    $to_index{ $line } = undef;
}

close $index;

open my $annotations, '<', $annotations_file;

while (my $line = <$annotations>) {
    next unless $line =~ /\S/;
    my ($keyword) = ($line =~ /^(\S+)/);
    if (exists $to_index{ $keyword }) {
        print $line;
        print scalar <$annotations>;
    }
}

close $annotations;
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Thank you very much for the neat solution. Using hash was so much faster than grepping madness. by the way, I modified the script to fit my file a bit, and it worked fine. One line I didn't understand and didn't use was code my ($keyword) = ($line =~ /^(\S+)/); Can you explain a little about this? is it the logical list? –  Alby Apr 17 '12 at 2:45
1  
It captures and assigns any initial sequence of non-space characters anchored at the beginning of the line to $keyword. –  Sinan Ünür Apr 17 '12 at 3:03
    
Thanks! another quick question is the parenthesis in my ($keyword) in that line, is that necessary? I am learning about the perl context and I remember () in my conserves the list context? but isn't that in the scalar context? –  Alby Apr 17 '12 at 16:16
1  
The match in scalar context would return the number of matches. So, we put a list containing a single item on the left-hand side. –  Sinan Ünür Apr 17 '12 at 16:17
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I suggest reading through file1 building an index of where each label appears in the file. The the labels of the required data can be read from file2 and the index consulted to see where to read the corresponding information.

This program show the principle. It isn't clear how to distinguish between the labels and the rest of the test. I have assumed they all start with Index, which is probably wrong but if you need help adapting it to your real data please ask again.

use strict;
use warnings;

@ARGV = qw/ file1.txt file2.txt / unless @ARGV;
my ($file1, $file2) = @ARGV;

my %index;

open my $f1, '<', $file1 or die qq(Unable to open "$file1": $!);
my $pos = tell $f1;
while (<$f1>) {
  $index{$1} = $pos if /^(Index\S+)/;
  $pos = tell $f1;
}

open my $f2, '<', $file2 or die qq(Unable to open "$file2": $!);
while (<$f2>) {
  next unless /^(Index\S+)/ and defined($pos = $index{$1});
  seek $f1, $pos, 0;
  print scalar <$f1>, scalar <$f1>;
}

output

Index1 annotation1
abcd
Index3 annotation3
hijk
Index5 annotation5
pqrs
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