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I'm trying to use a simple OOP model in javascript but somehow I failed. I wrote a simple code to demonstrate my problem:

<html>
 <head>
  <title>Test</title>
  <script src="scriptaculous/prototype.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript">
  var Person = Class.create({

  options : {},

  initialize: function(id, options) {
    this.id = id;
    Object.extend(this.options, options || {});
  },

  speak: function() {
    console.log(this.options);
  }
});
var person1 = new Person("abcd12",{
  name : "Jon Doe",
  age : 23
});
var person2 = new Person("cdef34",{
  name : "Jane Doe",
  age : 32
});
person1.speak();
//Object { name="Jane Doe", age=32}
person2.speak();
//Object { name="Jane Doe", age=32}
  </script>
 </head>
 <body>
 </body>
</html>

Obviously this is not at all what I want to achieve and since there is no proper documentation for Object.extend I don't know if this is normal or intended or not.

Thank you for your help

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No proper documentation for Object.extend, ey? api.prototypejs.org/language/Object/extend –  dontGoPlastic Apr 13 '12 at 20:15

2 Answers 2

The "options" property is on the prototype object, which means that it's shared by all instances. That is, when you mention this.options in that expression, it's not putting a property directly on the new object (this), but instead it's updating the existing property found on the prototype.

Just take that line:

 options: {},

out.

I think I'd write the call to Object.extend as:

 this.options = Object.extend({}, options || {});

(edit — actually now that I think about it, it's all because Object.extend updates the passed-in first parameter directly. If you just changed the call to Object.extend it'd fix it I think, though there's really no reason to put it in the prototype anyway.)

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Thanks, never thought about that :) –  Opi Apr 13 '12 at 18:09

Unless it's just because your code snippet is not complete, you're not actually doing any 'object extending', so you could just do this:

var Person = Class.create({

  initialize: function(id, options) {
    this.id = id;
    this.options = options;
  },
  ...
});

Here's an example of how to use Object.extend to merge the passed in options properties with default ones:

var Person = Class.create({

  initialize: function(id, options) {
    this.id = id;
    this.options = Object.extend({
      prop1: 'defaultValue1',
      bool1: true
    }, options);
  },
  ...
});

Using this code, if you did this:

var person = new Person('idString', {prop1: 'custom prop 1'});

Then person.options would yield:

{
  prop1: 'custom prop 1',
  bool1: true
}
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