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If i have this synchronized code which i want to replace with actors with no synchronization, how?

public synchronized int incrementAndGet() {
  i = i + 1;
  return i;
}

and i have a bunch of users in web site where i need to return each an incrementing number... how can i replace that code with actors code which have no synchronizations thus have no blocking synchronizing code. which i guess would thenn be able to run it on multicores etc (isn't that the purpose of actors?).

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2  
That's perfect use case for Akka agents. –  elbowich Apr 13 '12 at 18:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A simple actor wrapping i in its internal state:

case object Inc

class IncrementingActor extends Actor {
    var i = 0

    protected def receive = {
        case Inc =>
            i += 1
            sender ! i
    }
}

And blocking usage (you need to obtain incrementAndGet somehow):

import akka.pattern.ask

def incrementAndGet() = 
  Await.result((incrementingActor ? Inc).mapTo[Int], 1 seconds)

This code is: slow, complicated and non-idiomatic. What about AtomicInteger?

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just a few questions about the code above: –  Jas Apr 14 '12 at 6:33
    
i didn't want to use atomicinteger, i didn't want to use synchronized, the internet is full of saying actors can replace old multithreaded code with new one with actors with no synchronization so i suggested an example and i just see that you tell me that actors do not resolve the problem!!! i still must either do Await.result or AtomicInteger which is just like writing synchronized!!! actors do not resolve my problem then right!!? (in my examples). (sorry if i sound upset most tutorials say like actors is a magic solution to multithreaded synchronized code i just saw its not!) –  Jas Apr 14 '12 at 7:16
1  
The issue is that, with the example that you've chosen, using an AtomicInteger is probably the best solution. And also AtomicInteger uses compare and swap which is different from synchronized. –  Guillaume Belrose Apr 14 '12 at 10:38

Concurrency is a vast domain with multiple problems and pitfalls. There isn't a single approach able to solve all problems and a real concurrency expert is able to combine several methods to obtain the best result.

Currently on the JVM world, I don't think there are better alternatives than atomic integers for incrementing a counter, especially if the contention is very high.

That being said, if you want to use actors, the trick to get performance and scalability is to avoid ask (?) operations as much as possible. Use tell instead (!) and then yield. When the result is available, the actor will receive it and resume control. Nothing blocks and the thread pool is able to take care of the other actors in the mean time. That works only if most of you code is inside actors.

Starting with Thomas solution, you can write something like:

case object Inc
case class Count(i)

class IncrementingActor extends Actor {
   var i = 0
   protected def receive = {
     case Inc =>
        i += 1
        sender ! Count(i)
  }
}

class FooActor( counter: ActorRef ) extends Actor {
  protected def receive = {
    case DoSomething() => {
      // Perform some work
      counter ! Inc
    }
    case Count(i) => {
      // Do something with the counter result   
    }
  }
}
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Synchronously incrementing a counter (as in incrementAndGet()) has very little benefit if you want to use an actor. Hidden from view there is actually synchronization in the mailbox for the actor. Also, the AtomicInteger class works just fine on multicore architectures.

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