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I need to set value to a that depends on a condition.

What is the shortest way to do this with CoffeeScript?

E.g. this is how I'd do it in JavaScript:

a = true  ? 5 : 10  # => a = 5
a = false ? 5 : 10  # => a = 10
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possible duplicate of Conditional operator in Coffeescript? –  Trevor Burnham Apr 14 '12 at 2:12
52  
<rant> I wish coffee script could have just supported the ternary operator syntax, it's shorter and easier to read than if else then </rant> –  AJP Jul 28 '12 at 8:05
    
Boo. This is no good. Ternaries can be nice sometimes. –  Cory Schires Oct 26 '12 at 18:35
1  
@AJP I think the ternary would make coffee less Ruby-ish, even though Ruby has that. The goal with coffee is always readability and rounding off rough corners. –  jcollum Jan 16 '13 at 18:26
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@jcollum agreed, but what really I find most unsettling is that a = true ? 5 : 10 is valid coffeescript, but does not mean a ternary structure, instead (in javascript) it means: a = true ? true : {5:10} which is known as a bad thing® Additionally a = false ? {5 : 10} in coffeescript then (in javascript) is equivalent to: a = true ? false : {5:10} For what it's worth, I don't think it's good. –  AJP Jan 17 '13 at 9:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 209 down vote accepted

Since everything is an expression, and thus results in a value, you can just use if/else.

a = if true then 5 else 10
a = if false then 5 else 10

You can see more about expression examples here.

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a = if true then 5 else 10
a = if false then 5 else 10 

See documentation.

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In almost any language this should work instead:

a = true  && 5 || 10
a = false && 5 || 10
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18  
This works, but it's far less clear and there's no reason to do it in any language that has a better syntax for it. –  Ibrahim May 3 '13 at 0:23
    
It's not equivalent in many languages where there's implicit conversion to false of values such as 0, null, undefined,… and so on –  Lord of the Goo Jul 24 at 22:55

Sometimes it doesn't works as you expected...

a = true && 0 || 1 # expected 0? no!

far better to use language syntax.

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1  
this should be a comment, not an answer, since it doesn't respond to the original question. Answer/ask a few questions and you'll get the rep to be able to comment. –  Ben McCormick Aug 31 '13 at 3:34
1  
and i dont think it is any different then Alexander's answer –  Dhaval Aug 31 '13 at 3:52
    
Dhaval, it is a response to Alexander's answer. Just like I am responding to you with another comment, so could Neons. –  Lobsang Jun 18 at 15:15

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