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My data table looks like that:

chr4    124097568       124098568       337
chr4    159597106       159598106       1000   
chr4    159597106       159598106       1000 
chr4    164361532       164362532       455
chr4    164361532       164362532       74
chr4    164361532       164362532       2
chr4    170360150       170361150       0

I want to: Extract unique rows - if data in col#2 & col#3 is the same -> just the highest value (col#4) row should be extracted. If #2,#3 & #4 are identical just one of the rows should be extracted.

Preferred output is:

chr4    124097568       124098568       337
chr4    159597106       159598106       1000 
chr4    164361532       164362532       455
chr4    170360150       170361150       0

If something is not clear I'll try to explain it more (cause I really need to solve this problem now).

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Must you solve this using bash? This is the sort of problem that relational databases were built for: select col1, col2, col3, max(col4) from your_table group by col1, col2, col3. –  Greg Hewgill Apr 13 '12 at 19:21
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
$ cat example.txt
chr4    124097568       124098568       337
chr4    159597106       159598106       1000   
chr4    159597106       159598106       1000 
chr4    164361532       164362532       455
chr4    164361532       164362532       74
chr4    164361532       164362532       2
chr4    170360150       170361150       0

$ sort --key=2 -g -u example.txt 
chr4    124097568       124098568       337
chr4    159597106       159598106       1000   
chr4    164361532       164362532       455
chr4    170360150       170361150       0
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That would be easier if the last column (COL#4) was "right space padded", like this:

chr4    124097568       124098568        337
chr4    159597106       159598106       1000   
chr4    159597106       159598106       1000 
chr4    164361532       164362532        455
chr4    164361532       164362532         74
chr4    164361532       164362532          2
chr4    170360150       170361150          0

That way, a combination of sort and uniq could do the trick.

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awk '
    {key = $2 SUBSEP $3}
    !(key in max) || $4 > max[key] {max[key]=$4; line[key]=$0}
    END {for (key in line) print line[key]}
'
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This might work for you:

 sort -k4nr file | sort -uk2,3n
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one possible solution is to sort the lines of your input and then kill the lines which occur multiple times. In Python, you could do something like

f = open("table.dat", "r")
lines = f.read().split()
lines.sort()

old = lines[0]
singles = [old]
for line in lines:
    if old != line:
        singles.append(line)
        old = line
    else:
        pass

f.close()

I am unaware of how to do this in bash.

Best regards, Sven

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