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I have a list of numbers like so (randomly generated, numbers sorted within each sub-group. The groups are disjoint, meaning you won't find a given number in more than one group):

L=[[19,18,14,9,4],[15,12,11,10,6,5],[8],[16,13,3,2],[17,7,1]]

I am trying to count the number of ways I can create a decreasing-triplet.

A decreasing-triplet is a triplet where we scan the list from left to right and pluck out element 1 from a group, then element 2 from another group, then element 3 from another group where the end result should be in decreasing order naturally.

For instance, (19,11,7) is a valid decreasing triplet because these numbers come from different sub-lists and are in decreasing, natural order (19 comes before 11 which comes before 7 in the master list).

To clarify with a counter-example: (15, 9, 8) would not be a decreasing triplet because the 9 is coming from an earlier sublist than 15.

I am trying to count the number of decreasing triplets using dynamic programming or memoization of some sort. It is easy enough to set up a loop structure like so:

for i in xrange(0,len(L)-2):
    for j in xrange(i+1, len(L)-1):
        for k in xrange(j+1, len(L)):
            for item1 in L[i]:
                for item2 in L[j]:
                    if item1>item2:
                        for item3 in L[k]:
                            if item2>item3:
                                count+=1

But it does not scale very well for larger lists. I feel like there should be some way to count triplets by going through the list once. For instance, if I know one number is larger than another (or if I know how many numbers it's larger than), I feel like I should be able to re-use that information later.

For instance, I know 16 can come before 7 or 1 in a valid triplet. That's 2 "pairs." Therefore, if I am looking to create a triplet as I go backward in the list, and I look at, say, 19, I should be able to say "It's bigger than 16, therefore you can create two triplets from this because we know 16 is larger than 2 numbers." and so on.

I am just thinking out loud but would appreciate some insight.

share|improve this question
    
Are each one of your "group" lists disjoint sets of integers? –  Jason Keene Apr 13 '12 at 19:59
    
Yes; no number will appear in more than one group. Will edit for clarification. –  AOAOne Apr 13 '12 at 20:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use an index i between 0 and n instead of nested loops. Keep track of the last element of the current triplet. And use a memo to make it efficient.

L=[[19,18,14,9,4],[15,12,11,10,6,5],[8],[16,13,3,2],[17,7,1]]

n=len(L)

memo = {}
def f(i,j,last):
  if (i,j,last) in memo:
    return memo[(i,j,last)]
  if j==3:
    return 1
  if i==n:
    return 0
  res=0
  # take one from L[i]
  for x in L[i]:
    if last > x:
      res+=f(i+1,j+1,x)
  # don't take any element from L[i]
  res += f(i+1,j,last)
  memo[(i,j,last)] = res
  return res

BIG = 10**9
print f(0,0,BIG)
share|improve this answer
1  
Very fast and informative/great for learning –  AOAOne Apr 13 '12 at 20:18

Try the following itertool solution

import itertools
import time

L= [
    {19, 18, 14, 9, 4},
    {15, 12, 11, 10, 6, 5},
    {8},
    {16, 13, 3, 2},
    {17, 7, 1},
]


start = time.time()
for i in xrange(20000):
    count = 0
    for i in xrange(0,len(L)-2):
        for j in xrange(i+1, len(L)-1):
            for k in xrange(j+1, len(L)):
                for item1 in L[i]:
                    for item2 in L[j]:
                        if item1>item2:
                            for item3 in L[k]:
                                if item2>item3:
                                    count+=1

print
print time.time() - start

# result: 3.1542930603

start = time.time()
for i in xrange(20000):
    sum(1 for l1, l2, l3 in itertools.combinations(L, 3) for a, b, c in itertools.product(l1, l2, l3) if a > b > c)

print
print time.time() - start

# result: 1.94973897934
share|improve this answer
    
I'm just trying to count them, not enumerate them or actually know what the triplets are. –  AOAOne Apr 13 '12 at 20:03
    
@AOAOne: If you want to count them, just add a length to the list –  Abhijit Apr 13 '12 at 20:05
    
While this does work, it is slower than the current approach I've listed above. –  AOAOne Apr 13 '12 at 20:09
    
yeah I just ran both 20000 times, 3.15921497345 vs 4.37073898315 –  Jason Keene Apr 13 '12 at 20:10
    
For a much larger list: 5.54514414542 versus 131.797990247 –  AOAOne Apr 13 '12 at 20:11

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