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I'm wondering what the difference between the following queries (using two different join syntaxs) would be. I saw this in some code I was inherited and was curious if there outcome is always the same. And if not, why you would use one over the other.

Query #1 Example:

SELECT * FROM TableA a
  INNER JOIN TableB b
    INNER JOIN TableC c
      ON b.TableBId = c.TableCId
     ON b.TableBId = a.TableAId

Query #2 Example:

SELECT * FROM TableA a
  INNER JOIN TableB b
     ON b.TableBId = a.TableAId
  INNER JOIN TableC c
     ON b.TableBId = c.TableCId
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3  
look at the execution plan if there is any difference. – juergen d Apr 13 '12 at 20:07
    
Are you sure that #1 is valid SQL. According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177634.aspx I cannot see how that would work. – Alex Apr 13 '12 at 20:12
3  
@Alex Yes, that is valid SQL. Here is the fiddle to show no execution error: sqlfiddle.com/#!3/b00427/1 – Justin Pihony Apr 13 '12 at 20:15
3  
I find query #1 confusing and not very clear - I would personally always use query #2. The results and execution plans are identical so there's no functional difference – marc_s Apr 13 '12 at 20:24
    
Is query #1 the same as INNER JOIN (TableB b INNER JOIN TableC c ON b.TableBId = c.TableCId) ON b.TableBId = a.TableAId basically implicit ()'s...if so that'd be really confusing if you mixed in an outer join. – dotjoe Apr 13 '12 at 20:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As has already been stated, you can review the execution plans to verify that these are indeed the same queries. I am almost certain that they are, though

More to your question of why you would choose one over the other. I would say that this comes down to style preferences. Most of the time you will see Query #2 because it has a clearer definition for future readers. If you create a truly complicated query, then the benefit you gain grows tremendously.

I cannot really vouch for the other approach as I truly believe that it becomes too unreadable and should never be used. Again, that is my opinion and, the reasoning comes down to opinions/styles.

However, the standard way is query2, so I would stick with that :)...but again, just me

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"standard way is query2" -- both queries conform to the SQL standard (and are semantically equivalent). – onedaywhen Apr 16 '12 at 9:49
    
@onedaywhen Standard as in Industry Standard. Yes, both are SQL Standard, but very few devs write it in the way that query1 is written – Justin Pihony Apr 16 '12 at 16:36

Try to preview the execution plan. It will very likely be exactly the same.

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The execution plans of your query are exactly the same.

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