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How do I implement the function defined in the interface below? When I implemented in VS2010 like I have below. MyType gets greyed out and it doesn't recongise the type anymore? thanks!

public interface IExample
{
  T GetAnything<T>();
}

public class MyType
{
  //getter, setter here
}

public class Get : IExample
{
 public MyType GetAnything<MyType>()
 {      ^^^^^^^            ^^^^^^
   MyType mt = new MyType();
   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^    /* all greyed out !!*/
 }
}
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1  
This has an XY Problem feeling to it... –  Austin Salonen Apr 13 '12 at 20:22
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make a generic interface IExample<T> and then implement it using the concrete type class Get : IExample<MyType> as in the example below.

public interface IExample<T> where T : new()
{
    T GetAnything();
}

public class Get : IExample<MyType>
{
    public MyType GetAnything()
    {
        MyType mt = new MyType();
        return mt;
    }
}

public class MyType
{
    // ...
}
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1  
The method's type parameter T hides the interface's type parameter T; they have the same name, but they are independent. –  phoog Apr 13 '12 at 20:18
    
@phoog yes, thanks. But I think you can drop the method's type parameter. Updated my code example accordingly. –  Dennis Traub Apr 13 '12 at 20:23
    
you forgot a where T: new() on your interface declaration;) –  Raphaël Althaus Apr 13 '12 at 20:24
    
Yes, I think that's what you intended. It remains to be seen whether the OP is trying to store homogenous IExample<T>s in a single collection; that's usually what people want, and of course it complicates matters somewhat. –  phoog Apr 13 '12 at 20:25
    
@RaphaëlAlthaus Already added a few minutes ago. But thanks anyway. These are the details I always miss when writing code without the compiler. Once pasted in VS, it becomes obvious. –  Dennis Traub Apr 13 '12 at 20:25
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Dennis' answer looks like what you want but just in case it isn't, in order to get your code working, you can do this but I'm not sure how much value this really has...

public class Get : IExample
{
    public T GetAnything<T>()
    {
        return default(T);
    }
}

public void X()
{
    var get = new Get();
    var mt = get.GetAnything<MyType>();
}
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