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I've got a PHP script that includes ( or 'requires' ) a set of other scripts. This is effectively for importing all of my classes. What I'm encountering is an HTTP 500 error. I've sifted through and commented out code piece by piece to determine that it's failing on the require_once in one of my files.

Here is the code:

index.php:

<?php
require_once("std/classes.php");
?>

And std/classes.php:

<?php
RequireStandards();
RequireAddons();

function RequireStandards( )
{
    $ClassFiles = scandir("classes/standard");

    foreach( $ClassFiles as $ClassFile )
    {
        if( $ClassFile == "." || $ClassFile == ".." )
            continue;

        //require_once("classes/standard/" . $ClassFile );
    }
}

function RequireAddons()
{
    $ClassFiles = scandir("classes");

    foreach( $ClassFiles as $ClassFile )
    {
        if( $ClassFile == "." || $ClassFile == ".." || $ClassFile == "standard" )
            continue;

        //require_once("classes/" . $ClassFile );
    }
}

?>

This code will work as it sits, but as soon as I uncomment the requires, it fails. What strikes me as odd is that I have plenty of other sites on this server that act in almost an identical manner.

I feel as if I somehow have my PHP error reporting turned off... which I don't know how to turn back on; as I just upgraded to PHP 5.3. I would typically expect a 'couldnt open file' or some such in my browser, if PHP failed.

Maybe someone could tell me why this is kicking back an HTTP 500, or perhaps just how to re-enable error reporting. It would be much appreciated; this just doesn't seem to make much sense.

share|improve this question
    
Can you consult your server logs? –  miku Apr 13 '12 at 20:25
1  
Is your class folder in the root directory? Try adding a "/" before classes? Just a guess. –  Jim D Apr 13 '12 at 20:25
    
maybe a problem with your include path php.net/manual/en/function.set-include-path.php –  Alon Apr 13 '12 at 20:28
    
It's better to use $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] . '/classes/standard/; –  kpotehin Apr 13 '12 at 20:28
    
These are all valid comments - it turned out that the relative paths that were working fine in XAMPP did not translate so well over to IIS. After re-enabling php error reporting, I managed to figure out which these were, and correct them. It seems that file IO changed a bit from 4.?.? to 5.3. –  DigitalJedi805 Apr 13 '12 at 21:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To enable error reporting:

<?php
error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors', 1);
require_once("std/classes.php");
?>

Hopefully that should work.

EDIT: If this does work, remember to turn off display errors before putting anything in a live, public facing environment!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is the answer I was hoping to get. While @Madbreaks' answer was 'an answer' - it was not an answer to anything I asked. I will take your advice Madbreaks, and build an AutoLoad, but rather than answering with 'this is how you should write your code', can people start answering the real issue? It's quite the irritant to get 'rewrite your code' as a response to 'I know this is valid php why isnt THIS code working'. Thank you either way though. As for Jim D - this put me back on top of my actual PHP errors and I can fix a couple of 'failed to open stream's now. Much appreciated. –  DigitalJedi805 Apr 13 '12 at 20:36
    
@DigitalJedi805 - Glad I could help! The ini_set('display_errors') bit is something I'll generally toggle based on a production/environment constant. That way, I can't be clumsy and accidentally forget to turn it off. –  Jim D Apr 13 '12 at 20:43

You can temporarily turn error reporting back on using the error_reporting() function, for example to show all errors put the following code in your file:

error_reporting(E_ALL);

Of course, to change this permanently you should edit your php.ini file, and make sure you have error_reporting enabled as well as display_errors (at least if this is not a production environment). You can also try:

ini_set('display_errors', 1);

Though this may not work if you have a fatal error on the page. Again, to enable this permanently you will have to modify your php.ini file.

It is generally suggested that you enable display_errors only on non-production systems so that users don't get potentially sensitive information via your error messages.

In either case, you should be able to find the php errors in the apache error log, on ubuntu this is located here:

/var/log/apache2/error.log

Though it may vary based on your distribution.

share|improve this answer

I'd suggest you look into Autoloading Classes

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter...why? –  Madbreaks Apr 13 '12 at 21:11
    
I didnt do it but probably because this isnt an answer to the question I asked, nor does it help me fix the existing code, which should work regardless of whether I am following best practices or not. While I do appreciate the tip, and have already implemented it, you may read the comment to @Jim D's answer, in which I elaborate on how it was not 'helpful to my circumstance'. –  DigitalJedi805 Apr 13 '12 at 21:21

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