Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

can somebody explain me, why author thinks that below part of source code leads to race? Author says: "This design is subject to race conditions between calls to empty, front and pop if there is more than one thread removing items from the queue, but in a single-consumer system (as being discussed here), this is not a problem."

please see: http://digg.com/newsbar/topnews/How_to_write_a_Thread_Safe_Queue_in_C

Thank you

template<typename Data>
class concurrent_queue
{
private:
    std::queue<Data> the_queue;
    mutable boost::mutex the_mutex;
public:
    void push(const Data& data)
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        the_queue.push(data);
    }

    bool empty() const
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        return the_queue.empty();
    }

    Data& front()
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        return the_queue.front();
    }

    Data const& front() const
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        return the_queue.front();
    }

    void pop()
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        the_queue.pop();
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
IMO, the real bug is simply with calling this a concurrent_queue at all. It has enough locking to (probably) keep you from completely borking its internal state, but still lacks what you (normally) need (or at least really want) to work at all well for concurrent use. For example, on the consumer side you should really poll to see if there's data to retrieve; the consumer thread should block when the queue is empty, and wake up when there's data. If there are N data items, exactly N thread wakeups should happen (one thread N times, N threads once each, etc.) –  Jerry Coffin Apr 13 '12 at 21:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think what's confused you is that in the code you posted, there is nothing that causes a race condition. The race condition would be caused by the threads actually CALLING this code. Imagine that thread 1 checks to see if the thread is not empty. Then that thread goes to sleep for a year. One year later when it wakes up, is it still valid for that thread to assume the queue is still empty? Well, no, in the meantime, another thread could have easily come along and called pushed.

share|improve this answer
    
OK so as I understand that there is no race, which will make some bad memory access. The race that author is writing about is only a "logic" race, which you have explained? –  user1332475 Apr 13 '12 at 21:20

If you call empty you check whether it is safe to pop an element. What could happen in a threaded system is that after you checked that queue is not empty another thread could already have popped the last element and it is no longer safe that the queue is not empty.

thread A:                                 thread B:
if(!queue.empty());                            
                                          if(!queue.empty());

                                          queue.pop();

->it is no longer sure that the queue 
  isn't empty
share|improve this answer

If you have more than one thread "comsuming" data from the queue, it can lead to a race condition in a particularly bad way. Take the following pseudo code:

class consumer
{
  void do_work()
  {
      if(!work_.empty())
      {
         type& t = work_.front();
         work_.pop();

         // do some work with t
         t...
      }
  }

  concurrent_queue<type> work_;
};

This looks simple enough, but what if you have multiple consumer objects, and there is only one item in the concurrent_queue. If the consumer is interrupted after calling empty(), but before calling pop(), then potentially multiple consumers will try to work on the same object.

A more appropriate implementation would perform the empty checking and popping in a single operation exposed in the interface, like this:

class concurrent_queue
{
private:
    std::queue<Data> the_queue;
    mutable boost::mutex the_mutex;
public:
    void push(const Data& data)
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        the_queue.push(data);
    }

    bool pop(Data& popped)
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(the_mutex);
        if(!the_queue.empty())
        {
            popped = the_queue.front();
            the_queue.pop();
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
@KillianDS: I see no reference being returned. –  Ben Voigt Apr 13 '12 at 21:37

Because you could do this...

if (!your_concurrent_queue.empty())
    your_concurrent_queue.pop();

...and still have a failure on pop if another thread called pop "in between" these two lines.

(Whether this will actually happen in practice, depends on timing of execution of concurrent threads - in essence threads "race" and who wins this race determines whether the bug will manifest itself or not, which is essentially random on modern preemptive OSes. This randomness can make race conditions very hard to diagnose and repair.)

Whenever clients do "meta-operations" like these (where there is a sequence of several calls accomplishing the desired effect), it's impossible to protect against race conditions by in-method locking alone.

And since the clients have to perform their own locking anyway, you can even consider abandoning the in-method locking, for performance reasons. Just be sure this is clearly documented so the clients know that you are not making any promises regarding thread-safety.

share|improve this answer
    
What is wrong with that? Afaik you can pop an empty queue, it's just a waste of cycles but no issue. –  KillianDS Apr 13 '12 at 21:32
    
@KillianDS: queue::pop() calls pop_front() on the underlying storage. Whether you can do that is container-dependent, but all the Standard-provided containers forbid it. –  Ben Voigt Apr 13 '12 at 21:42
1  
@BenVoigt I thought it to be otherwise but I just checked the standard, I stand corrected :) –  KillianDS Apr 13 '12 at 21:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.