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Assume a standard has_many :through relationship among three models

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :memberships, :dependent => :destroy
  has_many :clubs, :through => :memberships
end
class Club < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :memberships, :dependent => :destroy
  has_many :persons, :through => :memberships
end
class Membership < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :person
  belongs_to :club
end

In an API driven application, you would expect to expose URIs that:

  • list the clubs that person x belongs to
  • list the persons that are members of club y
  • (...and the usual collection of CRUD methods...)

My first thought is to implement a pair of nested routes that map to the MembersController, something like:

GET /clubs/:club_id/memberships     => members_controller#index
GET /persons/:person_id/memberships => members_controller#index

... but here it gets a bit weird.

Both routes map to the same members_controller method (index). That's no problem -- I can look in the params hash to see if a :club_id or a :person_id is given, and apply appropriate scoping on the members_controller table.

But I'm not certain we want to expose Member objects to the end user at all. A more intuitive pair of routes (at least from the user's perspective) might be:

GET /clubs/:club_id/persons   
GET /persons/:person_id/clubs 

... which would return a list of persons and a list of clubs (respectively).

But if you do it this way, what controller and action would you map these routes to? Is there any convention in Rails that offers guidance? Or is this strayed far enough off the track that I should just implement it any way I see fit?

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I struggled with this before, too, and ended up exposing the "Membership" table. No particular justification, other than it seemed more intuitive than the alternative –  CambridgeMike Apr 13 '12 at 21:15
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3 Answers

addendum

(Not an answer -- just an observation). Most of this question can be re-framed as "how does REST handle compound keys?"

The REST philosophy is clear when you have a single ID to locate a resource such as /customers/2141. It's less clear what do do when a resource is uniquely defined by a compound key: in the example above, /clubs/:club_id and /persons/:person_id form a compound key that uniquely identifies a Membership.

I have not read Roy Fielding's thoughts on the matter. So that's the next step.

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Without regard to how you'd do this in Rails, the key to doing this RESTfully is that you can have hyperlinks. What is a list of memberships from a person's perspective but a list of links to clubs they are members of? (Well, with some extra data for each.) What is a list of memberships to a club other than a list of links to people who are members (again, probably with some extra data)?

Given that, the memberships from a person's perspective is really a view on the Membership table (and similarly from the club's perspective; at this level of abstraction there's no difference). The tricky bit is that when you change the memberships of a person, you've got to push the changes through the view back into the underlying table. That would still be RESTful; having a RESTful resource does not mean that the resource never changes when not given a direct instruction to change. (That would prohibit all sorts of useful things, such as shared resources!) Indeed, the real meaning of REST in this area is that the client shouldn't assume that it can cache everything safely, not unless the hosting service explicitly says it can (via suitable metadata/HTTP headers).

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How to write this with Rails… no idea, I'm sorry to say! The RESTful apps I've written have been with a totally different framework (and weren't database backed in the same sense either). You'll have to work that part out for yourself. –  Donal Fellows Apr 14 '12 at 17:36
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've ended up implementing routes and controllers that accomplish the following:

  • It's fully RESTful.
  • It's fully symmetrical: /persons/:person_id/clubs/:club_id/memberships is identical to /clubs/:club_id/persons/:person_id/memberships
  • It's very DRY.
  • Ordinary Users never see a Membership :id. Instead, :person_id and :club_id serve as a compound key that refer to a specific membership.
  • It does allow direct access to Membership objects by :id, but that's reserved for Administrators.

Here are some of the routes it recognizes:

/persons/:person_id/clubs/:club_id/memberships - a specific membership association
/clubs/:club_id/persons/:person_id/memberships - equivalent
/persons/:person_id/clubs - all the clubs that a specific person belongs to
/clubs/:club_id/persons - all the persons that belong to a specific club
/memberships/:id - access to a specific membership (accessible only to admin)

Note that in the following examples, I have NOT included the Devise and CanCan constructs for authentication and authorization. They're easy to add.

Here is the routing file:

# file: /config/routes.rb
Clubbing::Application.routes.draw do

  resources :persons, :except => [:new, :edit] do
    resources :clubs, :only => :index
  end

  resources :clubs, :except => [:new, :edit] do
    resources :persons, :only => :index
  end

  resources :memberships, :except => [:new, :edit]

  # there may be clever ways to specify these routes using #resources and
  # #collections and #member, but this ultimately is more straightforward

  match "/persons/:person_id/clubs/:club_id/memberships" => "memberships#create", :via => :post
  match "/persons/:person_id/clubs/:club_id/memberships" => "memberships#show", :via => :get
  match "/persons/:person_id/clubs/:club_id/memberships" => "memberships#update", :via => :put
  match "/persons/:person_id/clubs/:club_id/memberships" => "memberships#destroy", :via => :delete

  match "/clubs/:club_id/persons/:person_id/memberships" => "memberships#create", :via => :post
  match "/clubs/:club_id/persons/:person_id/memberships" => "memberships#show", :via => :get
  match "/clubs/:club_id/persons/:person_id/memberships" => "memberships#update", :via => :put
  match "/clubs/:club_id/persons/:person_id/memberships" => "memberships#destroy", :via => :delete

The controllers were surprisingly simple. For PersonsController and ClubsController, the only non-standard thing was in the :index methods, where we look for the presence of :club_id or :person_id in the parameters and scope accordingly:

# file: /app/controllers/persons_controller.rb
class PersonsController < ApplicationController
  respond_to :json
  before_filter :locate_collection, :only => :index
  before_filter :locate_resource, :except => [:index, :create]

  def index
    respond_with @persons
  end

  def create
    @person = Person.create(params[:person])
    respond_with @person
  end

  def show
    respond_with @person
  end

  def update
    if @person.update_attributes(params[:person])
    end
    respond_with @person
  end

  def destroy
    @person.destroy
    respond_with @person
  end

  private

  def locate_collection
    if (params.has_key?("club_id"))
      @persons = Club.find(params[:club_id]).persons
    else
      @persons = Person.all
    end
  end

  def locate_resource
    @person = Person.find(params[:id])
  end

end

# file: /app/controllers/clubs_controller.rb
class ClubsController < ApplicationController
  respond_to :json
  before_filter :locate_collection, :only => :index
  before_filter :locate_resource, :except => [:index, :create]

  def index
    respond_with @clubs
  end

  def create
    @club = Club.create(params[:club])
    respond_with @club
  end

  def show
    respond_with @club
  end

  def update
    if @club.update_attributes(params[:club])
    end
    respond_with @club
  end

  def destroy
    @club.destroy
    respond_with @club
  end

  private

  def locate_collection
    if (params.has_key?("person_id"))
      @clubs = Person.find(params[:person_id]).clubs
    else
      @clubs = Club.all
    end
  end

  def locate_resource
    @club = Club.find(params[:id])
  end

end

The MembershipsController is only slightly more complicated: it detects :person_id and/or :club_id in the parameters hash and applies scoping accordingly. If both :person_id and :club_id are present, we can assume it refers to a unique membership object:

# file: /app/controllers/memberships_controller.rb
class MembershipsController < ApplicationController
  respond_to :json
  before_filter :scope_collection, :only => [:index]
  before_filter :scope_resource, :except => [:index, :create]

  def index
    respond_with @memberships
  end

  def create
    @membership = scope_collection.create(params[:membership])
    respond_with @membership
  end

  def show
    respond_with @membership
  end

  def update
    if @membership.update_attributes(params[:membership])
    end
    respond_with @membership
  end

  def destroy
    @membership.destroy
    respond_with @membership
  end

  private

  # apply :person_id and/or :club_id scoping if present in params hash

  def scope_collection
    @memberships = scope_by_parameters
  end

  def scope_resource
    @membership = scope_by_parameters.first
  end

  def scope_by_parameters
    scope_by_param_id(scope_by_param_id(Membership.scoped, :person_id), :club_id)
  end

  def scope_by_param_id(relation, scope_name)
    (id = params[scope_name]) ? relation.where(scope_name => id) : relation
  end

end
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