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I have a part of a function that goes like this:

if (preg_match("#\bscript\b#",$userInput))
{
    $bannedWord = 'script';
    logHax();
    return TRUE;
}

This is causing a problem for what I am trying to accomplish because it will only match the exact word "script" and not variations of it, like "ScriPt" or "<script>".

What I would like to have is the examples of the not matched strings along with the original string return true.

Could someone provide me with a bit of understanding on this matter.

Also any tutorials that cover something like this would be greatly appreciated,

Thank you!

share|improve this question
1  
Possibly relevant: php.net/strip_tags –  Halcyon Apr 13 '12 at 21:10
    
@Frits thank you, that does apply. But it will not be entirely suitable in this case. –  IndigoIdentity Apr 13 '12 at 21:20
    
You can make it suitable by passing your allowed set of HTML tags like: strip_tags($untrusted_html, '<p><a><b><u><i>'); this will allow only simple HTML markup tags. –  Halcyon Apr 13 '12 at 21:33
    
@Frits The problem with that is that is will not be entirely effective at matching the differnt variations that I am aiming for, e.g. <script src="bla.... It is also the case that I am not only trying to match tags, but events too. Please see the post I have chosen below as the correct answer for the most suitable solution in this case. –  IndigoIdentity Apr 13 '12 at 21:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How's this:

if (preg_match("/<script\b[^>]*>/i",$userInput))
{
    $bannedWord = 'script';
    logHax();
    return TRUE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm you are a legend! Could you please explain your use of the two /'s I see they are to hold the string along with a regular expression? –  IndigoIdentity Apr 13 '12 at 21:26
    
The /'s in my code are liek the #'s in yours, the are the delimiters(?) of the expression, IE everything inside of them is the expression, the i after the last / says "make this case insensitive", <script\b[^>] is a little more complicated, basically it says "match <script followed by anything but not a >" and then the final > matches the close of the opening tag. phew! –  Dale Apr 13 '12 at 21:29
    
I highly recommend having a read of this website, as mentioned by another user here regular-expressions.info –  Dale Apr 13 '12 at 21:30
1  
I do find them interesting too, hence the question. I have only really found html5pattern.com as anything that has been of use to me though, so the link was a great addition. In anycase thank you for your advice/suggestion, i really appreciate it! –  IndigoIdentity Apr 13 '12 at 21:42
1  
:D Here's my super short probably crap email validator regex /\w[\.\w]+@\w[\.\w]+/ –  Dale Apr 13 '12 at 21:47

Case-insensitive matching:

preg_match("#\bscript\b#i",$userInput)

Note the i. Also note that this the first example in the docs:

<?php
// The "i" after the pattern delimiter indicates a case-insensitive search
if (preg_match("/php/i", "PHP is the web scripting language of choice.")) {
    echo "A match was found.";
} else {
    echo "A match was not found.";
}
?>

Cheers

share|improve this answer
    
Alright thanks alot, that helps :) but what about the before and after part? –  IndigoIdentity Apr 13 '12 at 21:14
    
Can you please update your original post to ask a single, clear question? It's not clear to me what you're after. –  Madbreaks Apr 13 '12 at 21:20
    
Thank you for your input Madbreaks it did solve the first problem but as in the second example, what i was lacking was the regular expression to match any characters before and after the string. like "<"string">" –  IndigoIdentity Apr 13 '12 at 21:29

If you really want to match "anything" before or after the string (not just a word), then you do not even need preg_match here, bacuse you could do something like this:

$userInputLower = strtolower($userInput);
if (strpos($userInputLower, 'script') !== false)
{
    $bannedWord = 'script';
    logHax();
    return TRUE;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This will match "scripts", etc. –  Madbreaks Apr 13 '12 at 21:19
    
Sorry but no, op did not –  Madbreaks Apr 13 '12 at 21:24
    
Thanks, and I've edited the post to make it clearer, and deleted my part of our little "argument". –  Pinetree Apr 13 '12 at 21:35
    
Hey and since you edited it, I was able to remove the down-vote. win/win. Cheers. –  Madbreaks Apr 13 '12 at 21:36

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