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Hello I'm a bit baffled that the cursor I have in this function is only returning the top row.

I've been comparing it to a few different examples I've seen and I just don't see what's wrong. Any guidance is greatly appreciated.

FUNCTION FS_A_FUNCTION
(
    inDate DATE
)
RETURN VARCHAR2 IS

tAnswer     VARCHAR2(1)  := 'N';
tDates DATE;

CURSOR c1 IS

SELECT S.Dates FROM A_TABLE S;

BEGIN 
OPEN c1;
LOOP
    FETCH c1 INTO tDates;
    EXIT WHEN c1%NOTFOUND;
END LOOP;
CLOSE c1;

IF inDate IN (tDates) THEN
tAnswer := 'Y';

END IF;

RETURN (tAnswer);


END FS_A_FUNCTION

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not quite sure what you're expecting to happen. After your loop tDates will have a single value from whichever row the cursor saw last. As your select doesn't have an order by, that could be any value from your table. I think you may mean to be checking the value against inDate inside the loop.

I'm not sure why you're using a cursor at all, unless the real logic is more complicated. If you're doing what I think, you could just do something like:

FUNCTION FS_A_FUNCTION
(
    inDate DATE
)
RETURN VARCHAR2 IS
    tAnswer VARCHAR2(1);
BEGIN
    select decode(max(dates), null, 'N', 'Y')
    into tAnswer
    from a_table
    where dates = inDate;

    RETURN tAnswer;
END FS_A_FUNCTION;

... or maybe a bit clearer bu the same logic:

FUNCTION FS_A_FUNCTION
(
    inDate DATE
)
RETURN VARCHAR2 IS
    tDates DATE;
BEGIN
    select max(dates)
    into tDates
    from a_table
    where dates = inDate;

    IF tDates IS NULL THEN
        RETURN 'N';
    ELSE
        RETURN 'Y';
    END IF;
END FS_A_FUNCTION;

In both cases I'm using max() in case there are multiple rows with the same date.

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This isn't the correct solution. It will hurl NO_DATA_FOUND if inDatedoesn't find a match rather than returning the desired tAnswer = 'N'. –  APC Apr 14 '12 at 6:12
    
@APC - even with the max? I'll have to try that later. Catching the exception might be neater (or clearer intent) anyway though. –  Alex Poole Apr 14 '12 at 6:27
    
No, you're right. I missed the signifance of the MAX() –  APC Apr 14 '12 at 13:17
    
Thanks to everyone for answering. What I find curious is that all responders say that I should be getting the last row when in fact the cursor was only checking the first or top row. This might be something wrong with how I'm looking at it. Need to do some research on the decode function but what everyone says about avoiding the loop altogether makes perfect sense. Thanks –  dee Apr 16 '12 at 13:20
1  
@dee - the last row that the cursor sees may have the 'top' value, it depends how the results end up being ordered when they're retrieved. Without an order by clause there is no guarantee of how the results will be returned. Try your existing code but with the cursor modified to have order by s.dates and then order by s.dates desc and you should see different results; also run both queries stand-alone and you'll see the value you end up with in tDates matches the last one in the query in each case. –  Alex Poole Apr 16 '12 at 13:53

You are testing if the inDate exists in the dates field of your table, but only after the loop ends, so the reference to tDates will be the last record of the query.

You can do this by simply checking if exists a record with the date:

cursor c1 is
  select *
    from A_TABLE
   where Dates = inDate;

As you can see, there's no need to do a loop.

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