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Ive got a div with the id "responsecontainer" and I want to load a page. If the contents of the DIV have changed then update the DIV otherwise just leave it the same.

Here is my code, which doesnt work;

<script>
$(document).ready(function () {
    $("#responsecontainer").load("qr.asp");
    var refreshId = setInterval(function () {
        $.get("qr.asp?randval=" + Math.random(), function (result) {
            var newContent = $('.result').html(result);
            if (newContent != $("#responsecontainer")) {
                $("#responsecontainer").html(result);
            };
        });
    }, 5000);
    $.ajaxSetup({
        cache: false
    });
});
</script>
share|improve this question
    
1. Have your server-side detect if they changed and send a sigil response/HTTP code instead. 2. How about oldHTML==newHTML? 3.What do you mean it "doesn't work"? It doesn't have a job? Your computer catches fire? Have you debugged to see what the difference is when you thought it was the same? –  Phrogz Apr 13 '12 at 22:19
    
You cannot compare two DOM hierarchies or JS Objects for equality other than being the exact same object. That's why your current test is failing. –  Phrogz Apr 13 '12 at 22:22
    
If you're not going to rely on the server knowing that it's changed, you may as well just update it blindly, is it a whole lot of HTML? –  Juan Mendes Apr 13 '12 at 22:33

2 Answers 2

This:

if (newContent != $("#responsecontainer")) {

Should be this:

if (newContent != $("#responsecontainer").html()) {
share|improve this answer
    
Or perhaps result!=$('#responsecontainer').html(), since `newContent is a jQuery object, no? –  Phrogz Apr 13 '12 at 22:21
    
var newContent = $('.result').html(result); looks like the value of result, actually, not a jQuery object. On further inspection, that line is incorrect though, it should simply be var newContent = result; $('.result').html(result); and even that has a pointless variable. Unless I'm completely missing something. =) –  Elliot Bonneville Apr 13 '12 at 22:23
    
$('.result').html(result); will return a jQuery object. I think OP was intending $('.result').html(result).html();. –  squint Apr 13 '12 at 22:25
    
@am not i am: Aha, that makes sense. I wasn't sure what he was trying to do there. :/ –  Elliot Bonneville Apr 13 '12 at 22:26

I wouldn't rely on .html() representations for string comparison.

The browser decides how the HTML string should be rendered, and the developer won't be able to have any control if the browser decides it should be displayed differently one time.

You should have a variable that is accessible to each interval invocation, and do a string comparison between the old and new responses.

$(document).ready(function () {

    var prev_response;

    $("#responsecontainer").load("qr.asp", function(resp) {
        prev_response = resp;
    });

    var refreshId = setInterval(function () {
        $.get("qr.asp?randval=" + Math.random(), function (result) {

            if (prev_response !== result) {
                prev_response = result;
                $("#responsecontainer").html(result);
            }
        });
    }, 5000);
    $.ajaxSetup({
        cache: false
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
It would appear that should work, but for some reason when I change the output on the qr.asp page, it doesn't refresh on the main (calling) page. –  midwest Apr 13 '12 at 22:42
    
Are you certain you're getting a response from the $.get call? If so, have you logged the values to the console for visual inspection? –  squint Apr 13 '12 at 22:44
    
Im pretty sure Im getting a response from the page...but no, I havent logged to the console. I'm new to jQuery, how would I go about doing this? –  midwest Apr 13 '12 at 22:46
    
@midwest: Most browsers have built in Developer Tools. Depending on your browser, you may need to enable them in the browser settings. Once you've done that, find them in the menu (for Firefox on Mac OS X, the "Tools" menu), and open the console. Then do console.log(result) in your code to see what you received. –  squint Apr 13 '12 at 22:50
    
Looks like I needed to start a new browser window to use the console log AND get the new code out of cache...sorry. This works like a charm. Thank you VERY much!! –  midwest Apr 13 '12 at 22:56

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