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If i have a time period, lets say DateFrom and DateTo and I have a list of Dates, These dates will be the split dates. For example:

DateTime dateFrom = new DateTime(2012, 1, 1);
DateTime dateTo = new DateTime(2012, 12, 31);

List<DateTime> splitDates = new List<DateTime>
    {
        new DateTime(2012,2,1),
        new DateTime(2012,5,1),
        new DateTime(2012,7,1),
        new DateTime(2012,11,1),
    };

List<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>> periods = SplitDatePeriod(dateFrom, dateTo, splitDates);

I want the result to be a list of periods, so for the previous example the result should be:

(01/01/2012 - 01/02/2012)
(02/02/2012 - 01/05/2012)
(02/05/2012 - 01/07/2012)
(02/07/2012 - 01/11/2012)
(02/11/2012 - 31/12/2012)

I have already wrote a method to do that:

List<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>> SplitDatePeriod(DateTime dateFrom, DateTime dateTo, List<DateTime> splitDates)
{
    var resultDates = new List<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>>();

    // sort split dates
    List<DateTime> _splitDates = splitDates.OrderBy(d => d.Date).ToList();

    DateTime _curDate = dateFrom.Date;
    for (int i = 0; i <= _splitDates.Count; ++i)
    {
        DateTime d = (i < _splitDates.Count) ? _splitDates[i] : dateTo;

        // skip dates out of range
        if (d.Date < dateFrom.Date || d.Date > dateTo.Date)
            continue;

        resultDates.Add(Tuple.Create(_curDate, d));

        _curDate = d.AddDays(1);
    }
    return resultDates;
}

The Question
It looks so ugly, Is there more neat and shorter way of doing this? using Linq maybe?

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5  
Fits better to Code Review –  L.B Apr 13 '12 at 22:16
    
Like TimeSpan? –  Ritch Melton Apr 13 '12 at 22:22
2  
@RitchMelton I believe TimeSpan has nothing to do here... –  user915331 Apr 13 '12 at 22:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is one that works and takes care of some edge cases also:

var realDates = splitDates
    .Where(d => d > dateFrom && d < dateTo)
    .Concat(new List<DateTime>() {dateFrom.AddDays(-1), dateTo})
    .Select(d => d.Date)
    .Distinct()
    .OrderBy(d => d)
    .ToList();

// now we have             (start - 1) -- split1 -- split2 -- split3 -- end
// we zip it against          split1   -- split2 -- split3 --  end
// and produce       start,split1 -- split1+1,split2 -- split2+1,split3 -- split3+1,end

realDates.Zip(realDates.Skip(1), (a, b) => Tuple.Create(a.AddDays(1), b));
share|improve this answer
    
While mostly all answers are correct, Yours is the best and comments are good.. –  user915331 Apr 13 '12 at 22:43
    
I fixed the first line a little to exclude duplicates. If two or more split date are duplicated then the result is wrong –  user915331 Apr 13 '12 at 22:50
1  
What's with the AddDays? Also - documentation of Enumerable.Distinct says we should not rely on it preserving order. –  David B Apr 14 '12 at 0:29
    
Thanks for the Distinct comment, moved it up in order. The AddDays is because the first element in each tuple is +1 over the second element in the previous tuple. That is, the sequence of periods does not overlap. –  yamen Apr 14 '12 at 1:39

You can do it like this:

List<DateTime> split =
  splitDates.Where(d => d >= dateFrom && d <= dateTo).ToList();

List<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>> periods =
  Enumerable.Range(0, split.Count + 1)
  .Select(i => new Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>(
    i == 0 ? dateFrom : split[i - 1].AddDays(1),
    i == split.Count ? dateTo : split[i]
  ))
  .ToList();
share|improve this answer

While L.B is correct and this probably belongs on Code Review, I felt like taking a crack at this:

Given Your First Code Block, the following code will do what you're asking for:

// List of all dates in order that are valid
var dateSegments = new [] { dateFrom, dateTo }
    .Concat(splitDates.Where(x => x > dateFrom && x < dateTo))
    .OrderBy(x => x)
    .ToArray();

List<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>> results = new List<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>>();
for(var i = 0; i < dateSegments.Length - 1; i++)
{
    results.Add(new Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>(dateSegments[i], dateSegments[i+1]));
}
share|improve this answer

If you put all the dates into a single list, then this should work:

var dates = new List<DateTime>
        {
            new DateTime(2012, 1, 1),
            new DateTime(2012, 2, 1),
            new DateTime(2012, 5, 1),
            new DateTime(2012, 7, 1),
            new DateTime(2012, 11, 1),
            new DateTime(2012, 12, 31)
        };

var z = dates.Zip(dates.Skip(1), (f, s) => Tuple.Create(f.Equals(dates[0]) ? f : f.AddDays(1), s));
share|improve this answer
List<DateTime> splitDates = GetSplitDates();
DateTime dateFrom = GetDateFrom();
DateTime dateTo = GetDateTo();

List<DateTime> edges = splitDates
  .Where(d => dateFrom < d && d < dateTo)
  .Concat(new List<DateTime>() {dateFrom, dateTo})
  .Distinct()
  .OrderBy(d => d)
  .ToList();

//must be at least one edge since we added at least one unique date to this.
DateTime currentEdge = edges.First();

List<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>> resultItems = new List<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>>();

foreach(DateTime nextEdge in edges.Skip(1))
{
  resultItems.Add(Tuple.Create(currentEdge, nextEdge));
  currentEdge = nextEdge;
}

return resultItems;
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