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This relationship between TDD and XP is still ambiguous for me, because one of the XP practices is to write test first. TDD also (My understanding) is just about writing test first.

So what's the new about TDD? and how it connected to XP?

An example will be appreciated.

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Considering that Kent Beck (re)discovered TDD (and wrote the book) and also wrote the book on XP (out of his work on the C3 project?)- I'd say they're very strongly related. Test First is a subset of TDD. I'm not sure what you're looking for with an example –  Gishu Apr 15 '12 at 10:27

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XP consists of a number of practices, designed to be used together. One of them is TDD. Organisations not necessarily want to adopt all of XP. The currently popular scrum takes a subset of the XP practices focused on planning and managing.

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XP uses test driven development (TDD) and refactoring to help uncover the most effective design.

That's from the Extreme Programming site. TDD is a practice that XP adopts.

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A central part of agile in general, and XP in particular, is the ability (and actually, necessity) to create the software incrementally at each iteration.

This is achieved by adding new code at each iteration, but also by refactoring existing code written during previous iterations. This refactoring can be safely achieved only if you have a strong test system, able to check that the whole software product don't break when you add new code, or when you modify existing ones.

Hence, when you develop your software, you finally create two separate, but strongly connected systems:

  • The software product you want to provide to your users
  • Its test harness that helps you build it incrementally

TDD is the best known practice to create this test harness, enabling you to create incrementally your software using an agile approach.

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I disagree that having a test harness insures that the product won't break since the test harness is, itself, a "product" which must be maintained. Unless the tests are written before the code, and are derived from the updated product specification, there is the potential to not test for the changes (you miss updated functional tests in the harness that then (coincidentally) miss function that wasn't implemented (functional test escape). This is why "Test First" is the better solution -- test scenarios can be derived from functional requirements and/or product specifications. –  Julie in Austin Apr 15 '12 at 15:03

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