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I was suddenly wondering why do we have non-static functions/methods? A method isn't a property of an object (like an attribute/data member) and all instances of that class use the same method, so why is there a differentiation between static and non-static methods? Does this mean when an object is instantiated it holds a copy of the methods - which are the exact same for all instances of that class?

EDIT: What is with all the negative points? My point is valid- the behaviour of a method does not change per instance of an object. The method is the same for every object, just a different object invokes the method, so why do we need to make the method part of the object?? Why can't the method just be stored once (like a static method) and then when using "this" we execute on the relevant object?? It seems silly to store non-static methods are part of the object, for every instance.

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"A method isn't a property of an object " - It is. The code isn't duplicated, but it is very much a part of an object's reason for existing. –  Mitch Wheat Apr 14 '12 at 0:24
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You can view it as simply being a collection of static methods that have an invisible blob of data, referenced through "this" :-). –  Robinson Apr 14 '12 at 0:25
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Why do we have static functions/methods in Java/C++/OOP? –  user166390 Apr 14 '12 at 0:25
    
Anyway, this is a somewhat interesting question that is buried ... I think (so I gave a +1) ... that can be addressed with how different OO language implementations handle "instance methods". For instance, in JavaScript, all methods are effectively "static" with a little bit of magic in how they are called (or what lexical scopes they bind). While in Java an instance method cannot be used without an instance to "send the message to". Conceptually, however, it is the same: a non-static (or instance) method is "associated" with some object when it is invoked. –  user166390 Apr 14 '12 at 0:29
    
Because too much static would be... shocking. B) –  minitech Apr 14 '12 at 0:29
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closed as not constructive by Mitch Wheat, Nicol Bolas, minitech, KillianDS, John B Apr 14 '12 at 0:53

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8 Answers

Static methods typically do not depend on or alter the state of an object. Non-static methods do typically.

As for if the method code is included with every instance of the object, no, it is not.

Basically every method is defined once, and then this is silently passed in as a parameter. A bit of an oversimplification, but hopefully gets the idea across.

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Ok that makes complete sense then- so both non-static and static methods are only stored in the class once, but non-static methods can be invoked with instances. –  user997112 Apr 14 '12 at 0:33
    
Yes, essentially. Though, they are't stored "in the class" because once it's compiled down to bytecode, there is no high level concept of a class. Both static and non static methods are compiled down to functions. Non-static are passed the this parameter whereas non-static are not. (Though of course it's not actually this when passed but the address of the data that goes with an instance) –  Corbin Apr 14 '12 at 0:37
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so that we can use this keyword inside the method.. simple. it belongs to that particular instance

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Non static methods can access the data (property/attributes) of an instance. Static methods cannot as they do not "belong" to an instance of the class. This is the point of object oriented programming. You are encapsulating the data and the functionality that works on that data..

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A non-static method doesn't belong to a an instance of a class like a field does. A non-static method simply means that it has access to the instance fields. In terms of copies, there is just one of them, unlike the fields in which there is one copy per object.

Now in OO languages with functional support a method can be a field of an object, but that's totally different.

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A non-static method is invoked on a particular instance of the class. A static method is invoked without an instance, and can run even if no instances of the class exist.

The instances don't actually hold separate copies of the methods' code, but only because there's no point storing duplicate copies of the same thing. You can think of a non-static method as belonging to the instance rather than to the class.

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I understand what a static method is. I was just asking if/why do we need to store multiple copies of a non-static method, because I thought each instance kept their own copy- which seemed silly. –  user997112 Apr 14 '12 at 0:36
    
In some languages, like JavaScript, you can actually redefine methods on a per-instance basis. So you can have a method stored directly on an instance. But even then it's a reference, not a full copy of the code. If you assign the same method to two different instances, they both refer to the same copy of the code. –  Wyzard Apr 14 '12 at 0:38
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Static functions aren't associated with an instance of an object. Member functions are, which is where the this keyword comes from; the compiler passes it as a hidden argument to the member functions but not to the static ones.

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One of the key ideas of OOP is keeping the data close to the code that operates on it. Non-static methods enable you to do just that: you can define functionality that is closely tied to a set of attributes so that the users of your class (which is a combination of attributes and functionality over these attributes) could pay attention to the functionality rather than to the data itself.

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Okay, let's see...

I was suddenly wondering why do we have non-static functions/methods? A method isn't a property of an object (like an attribute/data member) and all instances of that class use the same method, so why is there a differentiation between static and non-static methods?

The key to note is it is a conceptual difference. An instance method is "associated" with a particular object when it is invoked -- it has some form of "this" context -- while a static method is not.

Does this mean when an object is instantiated it holds a copy of the methods - which are the exact same for all instances of that class?

It depends on language, but generally no.

In Java, for instance, there is only one copy of a method shared for all instances of the class. Methods are not "part" of the data for instances of the class. In JavaScript one can get this sharing by using the [[prototype]] chain or, to a lesser extent, by reusing the same function-object for the same method in different instances. (However, one can also create a new method for each new instance in JavaScript, but that's a programmer's choice.)

In Java a "message" is sent to invoke an instance method; that is, it looks at a particular type and sends it the message along with the appropriate "this" instance. (This is more complex than this due to virtual dispatching, but... the key to note is there is only one copy of a method for a particular type is loaded into memory.)

In JavaScript a method is a first-class value (it is an object) that is named via a property of the object (or found in the [[prototype]]) that is dynamically bound to the receiver (that is, the "this" inside is established based on how it is called). Python works similar to JavaScript in that methods are first-class functions that are fetched and invoked (but methods are still "bound" to a class, which is unlike JavaScript). Ruby works more like Java in that "messages are sent" which in turn invokes a method (which is not a first-class value in Ruby) and implicitly associates the context to the receiver. All of these languages support various forms of "subclassing" (call it what you may) to adjust the MRO and share methods common to instances.

The method is the same for every object, just a different object invokes the method, so why do we need to make the method part of the object?? Why can't the method just be stored once (like a static method) and then when using "this" we execute on the relevant object?? It seems silly to store non-static methods are part of the object, for every instance.

This is what many language do -- including Java, C++, Python (usually) and Ruby (usually) and JavaScript (often), and it is a very valid point to conserve memory and overhead.

Happy coding!

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