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I have a csv with the first column a label followed by comma separated values:

LabelA,45,56,78,90
LabelB,56,65,43,32
LabelC,56,87,98,45

I'd like the first column (LabelA etc) to be the Key in a hash with the numeric values in an array.

I can read the file into an array or scalar but I'm not sure what to do after that. Suggestions??

Edit: Ok, so it looks like this assigns the value to a key ..but what about the comma delimited numbers in my example? Where are they going? Are they in %hash ? If so could you maybe dumb down your explanation even further? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
depesz is creating a Hash of Arrays. Try reading the perldsc link I gave you. It is the "Data Structures Cookbook", and there is a section on working with Hashes of Arrays, that I also linked for you in my post. The section on Generation of HoA has an example that is very similar to what you are asking for. –  daotoad Jun 19 '09 at 3:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, let's assume that there are no special characters and so on.

First you open the file:

open my $fh, '<', 'some.file.csv' or die "Cannot open: $!";

Then you read from it in loop:

while (my $line = <$fh>) {

Afterwards, you remove trailing white characters (\n and others):

$line =~ s/\s*\z//;

And split it into array:

my @array = split /,/, $line;

When it's in array, you get first element off the array:

my $key = shift @array;

And store it in hash:

$hash{$key} = \@array;

(\@array means reference to array).

Whole code:

my %hash;
open my $fh, '<', 'some.file.csv' or die "Cannot open: $!";
while (my $line = <$fh>) {
  $line =~ s/\s*\z//;
  my @array = split /,/, $line;
  my $key = shift @array;
  $hash{$key} = \@array;
}
close $fh;
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so it looks like this assigns the value to a key ..but what about the comma delimited numbers in my example? Where are they going? Are they in %hash ? If so could you maybe dumb down your explanation even further? Thanks. –  RH. Jun 18 '09 at 23:13
    
Well, this line: $hash{$key} = \@array; puts the values in hash. You can add: use Data::Dumper; print Dumper(\%hash); at the end of program to see how the data structure looks. –  user80168 Jun 26 '09 at 6:05

Personally, I like the Text::CSV_XS and IO::File module:

use Text::CSV_XS;
use IO::File;

# Usage example:
my $hash_ref = csv_file_hashref('some_file.csv');

foreach my $key (sort keys %{$hash_ref}){
   print qq{$key: };
   print join q{,}, @{$hash_ref->{$key}};
   print qq{\n};
}

# Implementation:
sub csv_file_hashref {
   my ($filename) = @_;

   my $csv_fh = IO::File->new($filename, 'r');
   my $csv = Text::CSV_XS->new ();

   my %output_hash;

   while(my $colref = $csv->getline ($csv_fh))
   {
      $output_hash{shift @{$colref}} = $colref;
   }

   return \%output_hash;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Text::CSV is part of the standard distribution. Hence I choose to use this. Just remove _XS from USE and the constructor. –  Stef Jun 19 '13 at 12:10

See perlfunc split and perldsc.

  1. Read each line.
  2. Chomp it.
  3. Split it on commas.
  4. Use the first value in the result as the key to your HoA.
  5. The other values become the array.
  6. Store a ref to the array in the hash under the key.
  7. ...
  8. Profit!!!

Make a hash of array references:

Your data structure should look like this:

my %foo = (
    LabelA => [  2, 3,  56, 78, 90 ],
    LabelB => [ 65, 45, 23, 34, 87 ],
    LabelC => [ 67, 34, 56, 67, 98 ],
);
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