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I'm writing a small Float class in order to compare floats more easily(as we know, because of the float's precision). So I need to reload almost all operators that double has. I find there is too much repeats, such as operator+, operator-, operator* and operator/. They are similar. So I used a macro to reduce the code length. But when I complie it, it doesn't work. The error is:

happy.cc:24:1: error: pasting "operator" and "+" does not give a valid preprocessing token
happy.cc:25:1: error: pasting "operator" and "-" does not give a valid preprocessing token
happy.cc:26:1: error: pasting "operator" and "*" does not give a valid preprocessing token
happy.cc:27:1: error: pasting "operator" and "/" does not give a valid preprocessing token

Here is my code:

struct Float
{
  typedef double size_type;
  static const size_type EPS = 1e-8;
private:
  size_type x;
public:
  Float(const size_type value = .0): x(value) { }
  Float& operator+=(const Float& rhs) { x += rhs.x; return *this; }
  Float& operator-=(const Float& rhs) { x -= rhs.x; return *this; }
  Float& operator*=(const Float& rhs) { x *= rhs.x; return *this; }
  Float& operator/=(const Float& rhs) { x /= rhs.x; return *this; }
};
#define ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(x) \
inline const Float operator##x(const Float& lhs, const Float& rhs)\
{\
  Float result(lhs);\
  return result x##= rhs;\
}
ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(+)
ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(-)
ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(*)
ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(/)

And my g++ version is 4.4.3

here is the result of g++ -E:

struct Float
{
  typedef double size_type;
  static const size_type EPS(1e-8);
private:
  size_type x;
public:
  Float(const size_type value = .0): x(value) { }
  Float& operator+=(const Float& rhs) { x += rhs.x; return *this; }
  Float& operator-=(const Float& rhs) { x -= rhs.x; return *this; }
  Float& operator*=(const Float& rhs) { x *= rhs.x; return *this; }
  Float& operator/=(const Float& rhs) { x /= rhs.x; return *this; }
};





inline const Float operator+(const Float& lhs, const Float& rhs){ Float result(lhs); return result += rhs;}
inline const Float operator-(const Float& lhs, const Float& rhs){ Float result(lhs); return result -= rhs;}
inline const Float operator*(const Float& lhs, const Float& rhs){ Float result(lhs); return result *= rhs;}
inline const Float operator/(const Float& lhs, const Float& rhs){ Float result(lhs); return result /= rhs;}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

## concatenates tokens to produce a single token; the result must be a valid single token. You don't need to do this for operator, as e.g. operator+ is not actually a single token.

#define ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(x) \
inline const Float operator x(const Float& lhs, const Float& rhs)\
{\
  Float result(lhs);\
  return result x##= rhs;\
}

Strictly speaking, you are producing a single token for the later one.

Preprocessors that are actually textual preprocessors instead of operating during tokenization, such as the one in GCC, are often lenient about this.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, good catching that. +1 –  Seth Carnegie Apr 14 '12 at 3:51
    
GCC's preprocessor has been integrated with tokenization for approximately 12 years now. –  zwol Apr 14 '12 at 3:53
    
I would say it's integrated, but not quite in the same way; the fact that it doesn't blow up on trying to produce a single token operator+ as noted in an earlier comment demonstrates this. –  geekosaur Apr 14 '12 at 3:56
1  
But it does! The OP showed you the error messages. –  zwol Apr 15 '12 at 16:40
1  
Visual Studio is lenient about this and GCC is strict and will error out. –  Adam Bruss Apr 9 '13 at 19:57

You can't use the ## in the macro; the tokens pasted have to be identifiers.

The first of the two occurrences in the macro can simply be replaced with a space. The second is much more problematic. Superficially, you might get away with:

#define ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(x) \
inline const Float operator x(const Float& lhs, const Float& rhs)\
{\
  Float result(lhs);\
  return result x= rhs;\
}

However, that is most certainly not defined behaviour; the x and the = are separate preprocessing tokens and won't (should not) be combined into a single token by the pre-processor. I suspect you will need to use:

#define ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(x, y) \
inline const Float operator x(const Float& lhs, const Float& rhs)\
{\
  Float result(lhs);\
  return result y rhs;\
}
ADD_ARITHMETIC_OPERATOR(+, +=)
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