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I'm doing a homework assignment in which I need to create a bitwise method with at most 24 operators. My code works...but I have 25 operators, one too many. Can anyone spot a more efficient way to do a piece of code?

 int isGreater(int x, int y)
    {
      int xSign = (x>>31);
      int ySign = (y>>31);
      int check1 = (xSign & ySign) | (~xSign & ~ySign);
      int same = !((( x + ((~y) + 1) )>>31) & 0x1);
      int check2 = (check1 & same) | (~check1 & !xSign);
      int equal = ((!(x ^ y))<<31)>>31;
      return 0 | (~equal & check2);
    }
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6 Answers 6

Try changing this line:

int check1 = (xSign & ySign) | (~xSign & ~ySign);

For this:

int check1 = (xSign & ySign) | ~(xSign | ySign);

That's one less operator.

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3  
+1 for De Morgan's Law :) –  ulmangt Apr 14 '12 at 4:52
1  
that's perfect thank you! –  Guambler Apr 14 '12 at 5:00

check1 is merely a xnor. Why don't you replace this:

  int check1 = (xSign & ySign) | (~xSign & ~ySign);

with this:

  int check1 = ~(xSign ^ ySign);

your version has 5 bitwise operators, mine has 2.

Note that your code will be more aesthetic if you use this:

  int check1 = !(xSign ^ ySign);

that is, logical negation instead of bitwise negation, but don't worry about the correctness because at the end you do away with all of the upper bits anyway.

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This line:

return 0 | (~equal & check2);

Could be simplified to:

return (~equal & check2);

(a bitwise or with 0 doesn't have any effect)

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Assuming that ints are 32 bits wide, you can replace this:

  int equal = ((!(x ^ y))<<31)>>31;

with this:

  int equal = ((!(x ^ y)) & 0x1;

And save yourself yet another one.

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Since you apparently can use addition it seems to me there's a much simpler way:

int isGreater(int x, int y) {
    return ((unsigned)(~x + 1 + y)>>31) & 1;
}

The basic idea is pretty simple -- subtract x from y, and check whether the result was negative. To keep at least a little challenge, I've assumed we can't do subtraction directly, so we have to negate the number ourselves (using twos complement, so flip the bits and add one).

Five operators -- six if you include the cast.

Noteworthy point: your calculation for same was pretty much adequate by itself (overkill, in fact -- you need to eliminate the logical negation).

Doing a quick test [Edit: updated test code to include more boundary conditions]:

int main() {
    std::cout << isGreater(1, 2) << "\n";
    std::cout << isGreater(1, 1) << "\n";
    std::cout << isGreater(2, 1) << "\n";
    std::cout << isGreater(-10, -11) << "\n";
    std::cout << isGreater(-128, 11) << "\n";
    std::cout << isGreater(INT_MIN, INT_MIN) << "\n";
    std::cout << isGreater(INT_MAX, INT_MAX) << "\n";
    return 0;
}

0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0

...all as expected.

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See the problem is...I also have to deal with negative numbers. So your code works, just like my int same does...but only if both numbers are positive. My extra code was all about checking if x and y were positive or negative. I also checked if the two numbers were equal to eachother to cover all the bases –  Guambler Apr 14 '12 at 6:22
    
@Guambler: Not a problem. This works for negative numbers. (or do you want to treat, for example, -10 as greater than -1, so you're really comparing magnitudes?) –  Jerry Coffin Apr 14 '12 at 6:24
    
I recieve errors when both x and y are TMin. –  Guambler Apr 14 '12 at 6:27
    
@Guambler: I don't -- I just tried isGreater(INT_MIN, INT_MIN);, and it produces 0, exactly as I'd expect. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 14 '12 at 6:32
    
This won't work when there's an arithmetic overflow in the difference. You calculate INT_MIN-INT_MAX and get 1, which is non-negative, whereas the mathematically correct difference should be negative. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 14 '12 at 7:10

I propose this relatively short solution in C, which handles the entire range of ints from INT_MIN to INT_MAX.

It expects signed integers implemented as 2's complement and it expects no ill side effects from signed overflows (known to result in undefined behavior).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>

int isGreater(int x, int y)
{
  // "x > y" is equivalent to "!(x <= y)",
  // which is equivalent to "!(y >= x)",
  // which is equivalent to "!(y - x >= 0)".
  int nx = ~x + 1; // nx = -x (in 2's complement integer math)
  int r = y + nx;  // r = y - x (ultimately, we're interested in the sign of r,
                   // whether r is negative or not)

  nx ^= nx & x;    // nx contains correct sign of -x (correct for x=INT_MIN too)

  // r has the wrong sign if there's been an overflow in r = y + nx.
  // It (the r's sign) has to be inverted in that case.

  // An overflow occurs when the addends (-x and y) have the same sign
  // (both are negative or both are non-negative) and their sum's (r's) sign
  // is the opposite of the addends' sign.
  r ^= ~(nx ^ y) & (nx ^ r); // correcting the sign of r = y - x

  r >>= (CHAR_BIT * sizeof(int) - 1); // shifting by a compile-time constant

  return r & 1; // return the sign of y - x
}

int testDataSigned[] =
{
  INT_MIN,
  INT_MIN + 1,
  -1,
  0,
  1,
  INT_MAX - 1,
  INT_MAX
};

int main(void)
{
  int i, j;

  for (j = 0; j < sizeof(testDataSigned)/sizeof(testDataSigned[0]); j++)
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(testDataSigned)/sizeof(testDataSigned[0]); i++)
      printf("%d %s %d\n",
             testDataSigned[j],
             ">\0<=" + 2*!isGreater(testDataSigned[j], testDataSigned[i]),
             testDataSigned[i]);

  return 0;
}

Output:

-2147483648 <= -2147483648
-2147483648 <= -2147483647
-2147483648 <= -1
-2147483648 <= 0
-2147483648 <= 1
-2147483648 <= 2147483646
-2147483648 <= 2147483647
-2147483647 > -2147483648
-2147483647 <= -2147483647
-2147483647 <= -1
-2147483647 <= 0
-2147483647 <= 1
-2147483647 <= 2147483646
-2147483647 <= 2147483647
-1 > -2147483648
-1 > -2147483647
-1 <= -1
-1 <= 0
-1 <= 1
-1 <= 2147483646
-1 <= 2147483647
0 > -2147483648
0 > -2147483647
0 > -1
0 <= 0
0 <= 1
0 <= 2147483646
0 <= 2147483647
1 > -2147483648
1 > -2147483647
1 > -1
1 > 0
1 <= 1
1 <= 2147483646
1 <= 2147483647
2147483646 > -2147483648
2147483646 > -2147483647
2147483646 > -1
2147483646 > 0
2147483646 > 1
2147483646 <= 2147483646
2147483646 <= 2147483647
2147483647 > -2147483648
2147483647 > -2147483647
2147483647 > -1
2147483647 > 0
2147483647 > 1
2147483647 > 2147483646
2147483647 <= 2147483647
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