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I have a simple fadeIn fadeOut animation, it's basically a blinking arrow. However, it doesn't loop. It just goes once, and it's done. I found an answer here -> How to repeat (loop) Jquery fadein - fadeout - fadein, yet when I try to follow it, mine doesn't work.

The script for the animation is

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#picOne').fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000);
   $('#picTwo').delay(5000).fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000);
});
</script>

the script given in the answer is

$(function () {
    setInterval(function () {
        $('#abovelogo').fadeIn(1000).delay(2000).fadeOut(1500).delay(2000).fadeIn(1500);
    }, 5000);
});

so I assume the end combination would be

 $(document).ready(function() {
   setInterval(function () {
        $('#picOne').fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000);
       $('#picTwo').delay(5000).fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000);
    }, 5000);
});
    </script>

Could someone please point out what I'm doing wrong? thanks

share|improve this question
    
I wouldn't expect that to work well at all. I mean, your animation runs for 10+ seconds but your interval is set to 5... –  elclanrs Apr 14 '12 at 6:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two details :

  • You have to set the interval to 10000 because your animation run 10s

  • If you want it to start now, you have to call it one time before executing the interval (the first execution of the interval is after the delay)

--

$(document).ready(function() {

   function animate() {
       $('#picOne').fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000);
       $('#picTwo').delay(5000).fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000);
   }

   animate();
   setInterval(animate, 10000);
});​

Demonstration here : http://jsfiddle.net/bjhG7/1/

--

Alternative code using callback instead of setInterval (see comments):

$(document).ready(function() {

   function animate() {
       $('#picOne').fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000);
       $('#picTwo').delay(5000).fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000, animate);
   }

   animate();
});​

Demonstration here : http://jsfiddle.net/bjhG7/3/

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1  
A better idea would be to use a callback instead of a loop. Trigger the callback when the last animation is done. –  fredrik Apr 14 '12 at 7:00
    
This shouldn't affect the position of the animation, should it? When it reappears, it's right above where it used to be. That's something else, right? –  Nata2ha Mayan2 Apr 14 '12 at 7:06
    
Your problem is that fadeOut() set the delement to display: none at the end of the fade, so it goes out of the flow. Alternatively you can use .fadeTo(1000, 0) to change only opacity: jsfiddle.net/bjhG7/2 –  Thomas Guillory Apr 14 '12 at 7:12
1  
(in this jsfiddle I've also used the callback method proposed by @fredrik to show it to you) –  Thomas Guillory Apr 14 '12 at 7:13
    
@Artimuz Okay, I get it now, but how do I make it so that it stays in it's spot? –  Nata2ha Mayan2 Apr 14 '12 at 7:21
function fadein(){
    $('#picOne,#picTwo').animate({'opacity':'1'},1000,fadeout())
}
function fadeout(){
    $('#picOne,#picTwo').animate({'opacity':'0'},1000,fadein())
}
fadein()
share|improve this answer
1  
you want to change your callbacks to pointers rather than execution - i.e. removed the "()" on the "fadeout/fadein" arguments on the animate() call. –  webnesto Apr 14 '12 at 6:50
    
This answer is close, but not quite. The original code first fades in pic1, leaves it for 3 seconds, then fades it out. Then it does the same with pic2. –  gilly3 Apr 14 '12 at 6:58

Take advantage of the callback argument of .fadeOut(). Pass a reference to the function that does the fading as the callback parameter. Choose which image to fade based on a counter:

$(function() {
    var imgs = $('#picOne,#picTwo');
    var fadeCounter = 0;

    (function fadeImg() {
        imgs.eq(fadeCounter++ % 2).fadeIn(1000).delay(3000).fadeOut(1000, fadeImg);
    })();
});

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/KFe5h/1

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As animation sequences get more complex, I've found using async.js leads to more readable and maintainable code. Use the async.series call.

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