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Is there a way of specifying multiline strings in batch in a way similar to heredoc in unix shells. Something similar to:

cat <<EOF > out.txt
bla
bla
..
EOF

The idea is to create a customized file from a template file..

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11 Answers 11

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Not as far as I know.

The closest I know of is

> out.txt (
    @echo.bla
    @echo.bla
    ...
)

(@ prevents the command shell itself from printing the commands it's running, and echo. allows you to start a line with a space.)

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1  
Is there a solution to pipe the content to another command? –  Vincent Robert Feb 14 '13 at 13:03

Yes, very possible. ^ is the literal escape character, just put it before your newline. In this example, I put the additional newline in as well so that it is properly printed in the file:

@echo off
echo foo ^

this is ^

a multiline ^

echo > out.txt

Output:

E:\>type out.txt
foo
 this is
 a multiline
 echo

E:\>
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Here's another approach.

@echo off

:: ######################################################
:: ## Heredoc syntax:                                  ##
:: ## call :heredoc uniqueIDX [>outfile] && goto label ##
:: ## contents                                         ##
:: ## contents                                         ##
:: ## contents                                         ##
:: ## etc.                                             ##
:: ## :label                                           ##
:: ##                                                  ##
:: ## Notes:                                           ##
:: ## Variables to be evaluated within the heredoc     ##
:: ## should be called in the delayed expansion style  ##
:: ## (!var! rather than %var%, for instance).         ##
:: ##                                                  ##
:: ## Literal exclamation marks (!) and carats (^)     ##
:: ## must be escaped with a carat (^).                ##
:: ######################################################



:--------------------------------------------
: calling heredoc with results sent to stdout
:--------------------------------------------

call :heredoc stickman && goto next1

\o/
 | This is the "stickman" heredoc, echoed to stdout.
/ \
:next1



:-----------------------------------------------------------------
: calling heredoc containing vars with results sent to a text file
:-----------------------------------------------------------------

set bodyText=Hello world!
set lipsum=Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

call :heredoc html >out.txt && goto next2
<html lang="en">
    <body>
        <h3>!bodyText!</h3>
        <p>!lipsum!</p>
    </body>
</html>

Thus endeth the heredoc.  :)
:next2



echo;
echo Does the redirect to a file work?  Press any key to type out.txt and find out.
echo;

pause>NUL
type out.txt
del out.txt

:: End of main script
goto :EOF

:: ########################################
:: ## Here's the heredoc processing code ##
:: ########################################
:heredoc <uniqueIDX>
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
set go=
for /f "delims=" %%A in ('findstr /n "^" "%~f0"') do (
    set "line=%%A" && set "line=!line:*:=!"
    if defined go (if #!line:~1!==#!go::=! (goto :EOF) else echo(!line!)
    if "!line:~0,13!"=="call :heredoc" (
        for /f "tokens=3 delims=>^ " %%i in ("!line!") do (
            if #%%i==#%1 (
                for /f "tokens=2 delims=&" %%I in ("!line!") do (
                    for /f "tokens=2" %%x in ("%%I") do set "go=%%x"
                )
            )
        )
    )
)
goto :EOF

Example output:

C:\Users\oithelp\Desktop>heredoc

\o/
 | This is the "stickman" heredoc, echoed to stdout.
/ \

Does the redirect to a file work?  Press any key to type out.txt and find out.

<html lang="en">
    <body>
        <h3>Hello world!</h3>
        <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</p>
    </body>
</html>

Thus endeth the heredoc.  :)
share|improve this answer
    
nice. thank you for sharing –  Amro Feb 28 '13 at 19:02
2  
+1, Two small improvements. use echo( instead of echo; else it fails with a line containing /?. Strip the number of the line with set "line=!line:*:=!", as with delims=: you remove also all leading colons –  jeb Mar 1 '13 at 14:39
    
Thanks jeb. Implemented. –  rojo Mar 1 '13 at 14:56
@echo off
 for /f "delims=:" %%a in (
     'findstr -n "^___" %0') do set "Line=%%a"

 (for /f "skip=%Line% tokens=* eol=_" %%a in (
       'type %0') do echo(%%a) > out.html
:: out.html
pause
goto: EOF



___DATA___
<!Doctype html>
<html>
  <head>
   title></title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <svg width="900" height="600">
        <text x="230" 
              y="150"
              font-size="100"
              fill="blue"
              stroke="gray"
              stroke-width="1">
                  Hello World              
        </text>
    </svg>
  </body>
</html>
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This is a great start. Look at stackoverflow.com/q/7885437/745412 for more details on how to do this. –  Jared Oct 28 '11 at 20:04

@jeb

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set LF=^


REM Two empty lines are required

another variant:

@echo off

:)
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
>nul,(pause&set /p LF=&pause&set /p LF=)<%0
set LF=!LF:~0,1!

echo 1!LF!2!LF!3

pause
share|improve this answer
    
+1, very nice to see an alternative way to create a LF and the effect of the pause command –  jeb Aug 18 '11 at 17:03

You can create a quoted block of text with a FOR /F loop, so you didn't need to escape special characters like <>|& only % have to be escaped.
This is sometimes usefull like creating a html output.

@echo off
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set LF=^


REM Two empty lines are required
set ^"NL=^^^%LF%%LF%^%LF%%LF%^^"

for /F "tokens=* delims=_" %%a in (^"%NL%
___"One<>&|"%NL%
___"two 100%%"%NL%
___%NL%
___"three "quoted" "%NL%
___"four"%NL%
") DO (
   @echo(%%~a
)

Output

One<>&|
two 100%

three "quoted"
four

I try to explain the code. The LF variable contains one newline character, the NL variable contains ^<LF><LF>^.
This can be used with the percent expansion to place ONE newline character and one caret at the line end.

Normally a FOR /F split a quoted text into multiple tokens, but only once.
As I insert newline characters the FOR-loop also splits into multiple lines.
The quote at the first and at the last line are only to create the correct syntax for the FOR-loop.

At the front of any line are _ as the first character will be escaped from the multi line caret of the previous line, and if the quote is the first character it looses the escape capability.
The _ delims is used, as spaces or commas causes problems with XP (Else the XP-Bug spurious tries to access garbage filenames).

The caret at the line end is also only against the XP-Bug.

The XP-Bug comes in effect when a quoted text contains unquoted ,;=<space> characters

for /f "tokens=*" %%a in ("a","b","c") do echo %%a
share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks. I am having a hard time following this, further explanation would be greatly appreciated.. –  Amro Aug 18 '11 at 11:21
@echo off
cls
title Drop Bomb
echo/
echo/ creating...
::                                   Creating a batchfile from within a batchfile.
echo @echo off > boom.bat
echo cls      >> boom.bat
echo color F0 >> boom.bat
echo echo/    >> boom.bat
echo echo --- B-O-O-M !!! --- >> boom.bat
echo echo/    >> boom.bat
echo pause    >> boom.bat
echo exit     >> boom.bat
::                                     Now lets set it off
start boom.bat
title That hurt my ears.
cls
echo/
echo - now look what you've done!
pause 
share|improve this answer
    
(thanks Justin) –  InterociterOperator Sep 1 '11 at 1:44

The usage of a macro with parameters allows to write a "heredoc" in a simpler way:

@echo off

rem Definition of heredoc macro
setlocal DisableDelayedExpansion
set LF=^


::Above 2 blank lines are required - do not remove
set ^"\n=^^^%LF%%LF%^%LF%%LF%^^"
set heredoc=for %%n in (1 2) do if %%n==2 (%\n%
       for /F "tokens=1,2" %%a in ("!argv!") do (%\n%
          if "%%b" equ "" (call :heredoc %%a) else call :heredoc %%a^>%%b%\n%
          endlocal ^& goto %%a%\n%
       )%\n%
    ) else setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion ^& set argv=


rem Heredoc syntax:
rem
rem %%heredoc%% :uniqueLabel [outfile]
rem contents
rem contents
rem ...
rem :uniqueLabel
rem
rem Same notes of rojo's answer apply

rem Example borrowed from rojo's answer:

set bodyText=Hello world!
set lipsum=Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

%heredoc% :endHtml out.txt
<html lang="en">
    <body>
        <h3>!bodyText!</h3>
        <p>!lipsum!</p>
    </body>
</html>
:endHtml

echo File created:
type out.txt
del out.txt
goto :EOF


rem Definition of heredoc subroutine

:heredoc label
set "skip="
for /F "delims=:" %%a in ('findstr /N "%1" "%~F0"') do (
   if not defined skip (set skip=%%a) else set /A lines=%%a-skip-1
)
for /F "skip=%skip% delims=" %%a in ('findstr /N "^" "%~F0"') do (
   set "line=%%a"
   echo(!line:*:=!
   set /A lines-=1
   if !lines! == 0 exit /B
)
exit /B
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In a Microsoft NMake makefile one can use true UNIX heredocs, as the thread owner requested them. For example, this is an explicit rule to create a file Deploy.sed:

Deploy.sed:
    type << >$@
; -*-ini-generic-*-
;
; Deploy.sed -- Self-Extracting Directives
;

[Version]
Class=IEXPRESS
SEDVersion=3
    .
    .
[Strings]
InstallPrompt=Install $(NAME)-$(VERSION).xll to your personal XLSTART directory?
DisplayLicense=H:\prj\prog\XLL\$(NAME)\README.txt
    .
    .
<<

clean:
    -erase /Q Deploy.sed

where << expands into a temporary filename NMake creates on the fly when executing the rule. That is, when Deploy.sed does not exist. The nice thing is that NMake variables are expanded too (here the variables NAME and VERSION). Save this as makefile. Open a DOS-box in the directory of makefile and use:

> nmake Deploy.sed

to create the file, and:

> nmake clean

to remove it. NMake is part of all versions of Visual Studio C++, including the Express-editions.

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+1 I always wanted to learn NMake. Is it very different from regular GNU Make (I have Cygwin and MinGW installed)? –  Amro Aug 17 '11 at 13:16
    
It is 20+ years old, and it seems to me, Microsoft has not developed it much further since they gave up exporting makefiles from Visual Studio. GNU make on the other hand has become pretty perfect and powerful. Makefiles are such great tools when working on the command-line. Oftenly they can supersede shell scripts/batch commands. I use makefiles on any platform; on Windows Cygwin's GNU make and NMake. I'm thankful that they still ship it with that GUI castle Visual Studio 2010. –  Andreas Spindler Aug 17 '11 at 13:46
    
I think it was replaced by the XML-based MSBuild –  Amro Aug 17 '11 at 14:30
    
Yes, it was. To answer the original question: it is actually not very different from GNU make... but the GNU make two decades ago. Nevertheless powerful. –  Andreas Spindler Aug 17 '11 at 14:57

This is even easier, and closely resembles cat << EOF > out.txt:

C:\>copy con out.txt
This is my first line of text.
This is my last line of text.
^Z
1 file(s) copied.

Output looks like this:

C:\>type out.txt
This is my first line of text.
This is my last line of text.

(copy con + out.txt, type your input, followed by Ctrl-Z and file is copied)

COPY CON means "copy from the console" (accept user input)

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1  
this would work from the console, but what about from inside a batch file? –  Amro Aug 22 '09 at 16:53

What the OP wanted was something very specific (creating a text file with the output) and the accepted answer does that perfectly, but the solution presented does not work well outside of that specific context. For example, if I want to pass multi-line input into a command, I can't use the ( echo ) syntax. Here's what wound up working for me.

Given a perl script named "echolines.pl" consisting of the following (to simulate a 'real' program):

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<>) {
        chomp;
        print qq(<$_>\n);
}

and a batch file named "testme.bat" containing:

@echo off

set FOO=foo
set BAR=bar
set BAZ=baz

echo %FOO%^
&echo %BAR%^
&echo %BAZ%|perl echolines.pl

running it produces the expected output:

C:\>testme
<foo>
<bar>
<baz>

Care with whitespace must be taken to ensure it all works correctly with no stray spaces anywhere. Specifically: each end-of-line should be a caret (^) followed by a newline, the subsequent lines must begin immediately with the ampersand (&) and the last line must have the pipe starting immediately after the last item to be sent. Failing to do this will result in missing parameters or extra whitespace before and after the parameters.

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