Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have problems to perform my R-Code in OSX. That's my code:

i <- 1
while (i <= 20000) {
  repeat{
    z1=((runif(1,0,1)*2)-1)
    z2=((runif(1,0,1)*2)-1)
    h=z1**2+z2**2
    if((h > 0) && (h <= 1)){break}
   }
  x[i] <- z1
  y[i] <- z2
  q[i] <- h

  i <- i + 1
} 

j <- 1
while (j <= 20000) {
  h=sqrt((-2*ln(q[j]))/q[j])
  p[j] <- h
  j <- j + 1
}

a=x*p
b=y*p
points(a,b, pch=c(20,20),col=c("dark green","red"),cex=0.6)

When I initialize x,y,q,p and use the log, it works.

But why are there those errors, but why?

error in x[i] <- z1: object 'x' not fund
error: no function for "ln" fund
error: object 'x' not fund
error: object 'y' not fund
share|improve this question
    
Please start accepting the correct answers to your previous questions, it is considered good form to do so and currently you have accepted none... –  Paul Hiemstra Apr 14 '12 at 8:23
1  
The assignment to x (x[i] <- z1) should not work under any circumstance, whether Win7 or OS X. Please make your question more clear as to what the problem is. –  Paul Hiemstra Apr 14 '12 at 8:29
    
Because if they are not initialized, they do not exist. And if they do not exist, you cannot assign a value to them. Did this run on win7? I doubt it... –  Paul Hiemstra Apr 14 '12 at 8:41
    
yes i swear this code runs on win7 without an error.... –  jeffrey Apr 14 '12 at 8:47
5  
I would be curious to see how your code runs on a Win7 machine. Perhaps try this. 1. Close R on your Win machine. 2. Copy the code from your post above. 3. Open R on your Win machine and paste your R code into it. I suggest this because sometimes I have tried a bunch of stuff in R to get code to run and it only runs in the end because of accumulated earlier code stored in the same open R session from previous attempts. –  Mark Miller Apr 14 '12 at 9:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's another approach. Your code should generally be faster if you reduce the number of times you need to do things iteratively. Specifically, all of your runif(1,0,1) calls can be replaced by one big vector of runif() values, then subset the vector based on that.

I used @Mark Miller's function as the starting point and made the following modifications. Note, this can be improved further if the oversampler kept the good values from the previous set of random numbers and only filled in until n was reached, but this is pretty fast regardless. For the speed comparisons, I took his code verbatim and wrapped it in fun2 <- function() {...}

fun1 <- function(n, oversample = 1.50){
  #oversample
  over <- ceiling(n * oversample)
  goodvars <- NA
  while (length(goodvars) < n){
    z1 <- runif(over,-1,1)
    z2 <- runif(over,-1,1)
    h <- z1^2 + z2^2  
    goodvars <- which(h > 0 & h < 1)
  }
  goodvars <- goodvars[1:n]
  x <- z1[goodvars]
  y <- z2[goodvars]
  q <- h[goodvars]
  p <- sqrt((-2 * log(q)) / q)
  a <- x * p
  b <- y * p
  return(cbind(a,b))
 }

##Mark's code put into a function
fun2 <- function() {
  i <- 1

  x <- rep(NA, 20)
  y <- rep(NA, 20)
  q <- rep(NA, 20)
  p <- rep(NA, 20)

  while (i <= 20) {

    repeat{
      z1=((runif(1,0,1)*2)-1)
      z2=((runif(1,0,1)*2)-1)
      h=z1**2+z2**2
      if((h > 0) & (h <= 1)){break}
    }
    x[i] <- z1
    y[i] <- z2
    q[i] <- h

    i <- i + 1
  } 

  j <- 1
  while (j <= 20) {

    h=sqrt((-2*log(q[j]))/q[j])

    p[j] <- h

    j <- j + 1
  }

  a=x*p
  b=y*p
}

#Do some speed checking with rbenchmark. Also checkout compiler package for some free speed
library(compiler)
library(rbenchmark)
#Compile functions to see improvements
cfun1 <- cmpfun(fun1)
cfun2 <- cmpfun(fun2)
#run benchmark tests
benchmark(fun1(n = 20), fun2(), cfun1(n = 20), cfun2(),
          replications = 1000,
          columns=c("test", "elapsed", "relative"),
          order = "elapsed")

And the results

           test elapsed  relative
3 cfun1(n = 20)   0.042  1.000000
1  fun1(n = 20)   0.055  1.309524
4       cfun2()   0.407  9.690476
2        fun2()   0.882 21.000000

Starting with a new R session, copying and pasting the code above does not return an error. Here's an example:

test <- fun1(n = 1000)
plot(test)

enter image description here

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
but i get the error, "object fun2 not found, error in cmpfun(fun2)...do you know why??? –  jeffrey Apr 14 '12 at 18:10
    
@Chase - Also change to ((runif(over,0,1) * 2) - 1) to runif(over,-1,1) –  Tommy Apr 14 '12 at 18:23
    
@jeffrey - sorry, I defined fun2 as Mark Miller's code put into function form. I added it above so you should be able to copy/paste all and see the results. I tested the compiler package to see if/what speed bumps you can get from byte compiling the functions...it's essentially free speed! –  Chase Apr 14 '12 at 18:45
    
@Tommy - yes,good point. thank you! –  Chase Apr 14 '12 at 18:47
    
Also note that the speed tests shown above will get slower and slower for mark's code as that loop is going to have to be called many more times, the function I put together should scale pretty well to large n –  Chase Apr 14 '12 at 18:47

Does this do what you want? I:

  1. added vectors to store x, y, q, and p.
  2. changed ln to log
  3. added a plot(a,b) statement.
  4. changed 20000 to 20 for debugging purposes.

I do not have a Mac.

i <- 1

x <- rep(NA, 20)
y <- rep(NA, 20)
q <- rep(NA, 20)
p <- rep(NA, 20)

while (i <= 20) {

repeat{
    z1=((runif(1,0,1)*2)-1)
    z2=((runif(1,0,1)*2)-1)
    h=z1**2+z2**2
if((h > 0) & (h <= 1)){break}
 }
x[i] <- z1
y[i] <- z2
q[i] <- h

i <- i + 1
} 

j <- 1
while (j <= 20) {

h=sqrt((-2*log(q[j]))/q[j])

p[j] <- h

j <- j + 1
}

a=x*p
b=y*p
plot(a,b)
points(a,b, pch=c(20,20),col=c("dark green","red"),cex=0.6)
share|improve this answer
    
+1, but it still feels like C code written in R. This could probably be reduced to a line of 5 by useing vectorization and apply style loops. –  Paul Hiemstra Apr 14 '12 at 8:45

You can't be starting from a fresh empty workspace on Windows. The 'x' object must already exist, or you'd get the error there too. Do ls() in Windows and OSX and see if there is an 'x'. I'd put money on there being one in Windows but not OSX.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, your absolutely right :-) so I must initialize x one time, then I can use it in that workspace? –  jeffrey Apr 14 '12 at 17:14
1  
Probably. When you start R it loads objects from a .RData file, and when you quit it asks if you want to save your current objects back to a .RData file. Basic stuff! –  Spacedman Apr 14 '12 at 19:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.