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I found netcat is very useful for listening TCP connection by using -l port-number, but I'm wondering if there is a more powerful tool available to analysis all incoming protocol, like RADIUS client request, so I can check out what the request are made of and if server get the request

netstat maybe the way to go with the -c flag, but it doesn't show even tcp connection with custom port number

any idea?

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3 Answers 3

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Why don't you use netstat and grep the output to filter only the ports that you need?

The output is similar to this:

Proto Recv-Q Send-Q  Local Address          Foreign Address        (state)    
tcp4       0      0  192.168.1.7.63364      64.34.119.101.80       ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  192.168.1.7.63357      64.34.119.13.80        ESTABLISHED

and it is very simple to grep results by protocol, port, address and state.

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Wireshark offers a command line tool as well as a GUI (http://www.wireshark.org/)

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Bro is a (command-line) tool that extracts a wide range of information from network traffic. It is port agnostic, e.g., can detect HTTP on non-standard ports and features a application parsers for a variety of protocols. The connection log provides a lot of useful information at flow granularity, including:

  • Timestamp
  • Connection 5-tuple (source host, source port, destination host, destination port, transport protocol)
  • Application-layer protocol
  • Duration
  • Transport-layer bytes sent (source and destination)
  • Connection status
  • Number of packets (source and destination)

See this answer for example output.

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