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I checked but seem to be unable to see how to directly serialize a class to a byte array and subsequently deserialize from a byte array using Marc Gravell's protobuf-net implementation.

Edit: I changed the question and provided code because the original question of how to serialize into byte[] without having to go through stream was admittedly trivial. My apologies.

Updated Question: Is there any way to not have to deal with generics and instead infer the type of the property "MessageBody" through reflection when it is passed through the constructor? I assume I cannot serialize object type, correct? The current solution looks very cumbersome in that I need to pass in the type of the MessageBody each time I instantiate a new Message. Is there a sleeker solution to this?

I came up with the following:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Message<string> msg = new Message<string>("Producer", "Consumer", "Test Message");

        byte[] byteArray = msg.Serialize();
        Message<string> message = Message<string>.Deserialize(byteArray);

        Console.WriteLine("Output");
        Console.WriteLine(message.From);
        Console.WriteLine(message.To);
        Console.WriteLine(message.MessageBody);

        Console.ReadLine();

    }
}

[ProtoContract]
public class Message<T>
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public string From { get; private set; }
    [ProtoMember(2)]
    public string To { get; private set; }
    [ProtoMember(3)]
    public T MessageBody { get; private set; }

    public Message()
    {

    }

    public Message(string from, string to, T messageBody)
    {
        this.From = from;
        this.To = to;
        this.MessageBody = messageBody;
    }

    public byte[] Serialize()
    {
        byte[] msgOut;

        using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            Serializer.Serialize(stream, this);
            msgOut = stream.GetBuffer();
        }

        return msgOut;
    }

    public static Message<T> Deserialize(byte[] message)
    {
        Message<T> msgOut;

        using (var stream = new MemoryStream(message))
        {
            msgOut = Serializer.Deserialize<Message<T>>(stream);
        }

        return msgOut;
    }   
}

What I like to get to is something such as:

Message newMsg = new Message("Producer", "Consumer", Foo); byte[] byteArray = newMsg.Serialize();

and Message msg = Message.Deserialize(byteArray);

(where Deserialize is a static method and it always deserializes into an object of type Message and only needs to know what type to deserialize the message body into).

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isn't Protobuf.net open-source? –  Mitch Wheat Apr 14 '12 at 9:36
    
It is but I do not want to adjust the source because I like to keep up with new versions without having to make subsequent adjustments because the library is just a very small component as part of much larger projects. –  Matt Wolf Apr 14 '12 at 9:39
    
A MemoryStream is just a byte array in disguise, what's the problem of using that? –  João Angelo Apr 14 '12 at 10:08
    
am aware but was wondering whether there was a function overload that I may have overlooked –  Matt Wolf Apr 14 '12 at 10:16
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

there's a few different questions here, so I'll answer what I can see: if I've missed anything just let me know.

Firstly, as noted, a MemoryStream is the most common way of getting to a byte[]. This is consistent with most serializers - for example, XmlSerializer, BinaryFormatter and DataContractSerializer also don't have an "as a byte[] overload", but will accept MemoryStream.

Generics: you don't need to use generics; v1 has Serializer.NonGeneric, which wraps this away from you. In v2, the "core" is non-generic, and can be accessed via RuntimeTypeModel.Default; of course Serializer and Serializer.NonGeneric continue to work.

For the issue of having to include the type: yes, the protobuf spec assumes the receiver knows what type of data they are being given. A simple option here is to use a simple wrapper object as the "root" object, with multiple typed properties for the data (only one of which is non-null). Another option might spring from the inbuilt inheritance support via ProtoInclude (note: as an implementation detail, these two approaches are identical).

In your specific example, perhaps consider:

[ProtoContract]
[ProtoInclude(1, typeof(Message<Foo>))]
.... More as needed
[ProtoInclude(8, typeof(Message<Bar>))]
public abstract class Message
{   }
[ProtoContract]
public class Message<T> : Message
{
    ...
}

Then just serialize with <Message> - the API will create the right type automatically.

With recent builds, there is also a DynmaicType option that includes type data for you, for example:

[ProtoContract]
public class MyRoot {
    [ProtoMember(1, DynamicType=true)]
    public object Value { get; set; }
}

This will work for any Value that holds a contract-type instance (but not for primitives, and ideally not involving inheritance).

share|improve this answer
    
Marc, thanks for the comments. The last of your suggestions looks like exactly what I was looking for. Let me play with it a bit and get back to you. –  Matt Wolf Apr 14 '12 at 17:16
    
@Freddy I would have advised the ProtoInclude one personally, but: whatever works... –  Marc Gravell Apr 14 '12 at 17:26
    
Looking at both...thanks a thousand for your advise. Protobuf-net is an awesome library by the way –  Matt Wolf Apr 15 '12 at 4:42
    
Question though: if I use protoinclude won't I limit myself to having to specify the T types at compile time? I look for a solution that essentially lets me serialize any kind of objects without having to specify which components the object consists of until runtime. –  Matt Wolf Apr 15 '12 at 4:47
    
Marc, I run performance tests and I think the DynamicType solution works very well. I use Protobuf-net to serialize/deserialize control messages that are not latency critical. I also run another high throughput/low latency message stream that processes over 10 million messages per second but convert to raw byte arrays based on my own custom serialization routines of primitive types because it proved to be faster. Your solution was exactly what I was looking for, thanks a lot for your help especially given its a weekend. –  Matt Wolf Apr 15 '12 at 5:52
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The code the OP posted wouldn't quite work for me, the following is a slight adaptation taking onboard a little more of Marc Gravell's suggestions. Inheriting from Message was needed to prevent "Cyclic inheritance is not allowed", and as noted in the code comments below GetBuffer wasn't working out either.

Hoping it helps someone else, took me a good few hours to get it all to work...



      [ProtoContract]
      public abstract class Message
      {
        public byte[] Serialize()
        {
          byte[] result;
          using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
          {
            Serializer.Serialize(stream, this);
            result = stream.ToArray(); //GetBuffer was giving me a Protobuf.ProtoException of "Invalid field in source data: 0" when deserializing
          }
          return result;
        }
      }

      [ProtoContract]
      public class Message : Message
      {
        [ProtoMember(1)]
        public string From { get; private set; }
        [ProtoMember(2)]
        public string To { get; private set; }
        [ProtoMember(3)]
        public T MessageBody { get; private set; }

        public Message()
        { }

        public Message(string from, string to, T messageBody)
        {
          this.From = from;
          this.To = to;
          this.MessageBody = messageBody;
        }

        public static Message Deserialize(byte[] message)
        {
          Message result;
          using (var stream = new MemoryStream(message))
          {
            result = Serializer.Deserialize>(stream);
          }
          return result;
        }
      }

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