Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let V be a class with a single attribute named K and its getter and setters.

What's supposed to happen if I do:

V v = new V();
v.setK("a");
HashMap<K,V> map = new HashMap<K,V>();
map.put(v.getk(),v);
v.setK("b");

As far as I know, this should cause some kind of problem because a map key is supposed to be invariable. What would happen here?

Edit: Consider the key not to be a String but a mutable object as stated in the coment below.

share|improve this question
1  
Scenario with a problem is when you object K[ey] is a complex object itself. For example, contains attribute A and K calculates own hashCode based on A value. In that case, if A changed after you use K as key in map - it's violation of Map contract. Quote from JavaDoc: great care must be exercised if mutable objects are used as map keys. The behavior of a map is not specified if the value of an object is changed in a manner that affects equals comparisons while the object is a key in the map. –  Vadim Ponomarev Apr 14 '12 at 11:13
    
Of course, my bad. I always meant this case, using a String as Key was just a bad example. I'm editing the question, thanks. –  Hallucynogenyc Apr 14 '12 at 11:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Quote from "Map" interface JavaDoc:

Great care must be exercised if mutable objects are used as map keys. The behavior of a map is not specified if the value of an object is changed in a manner that affects equals comparisons while the object is a key in the map.

You simply shouldn't mutate keys (in the way which changes their "hashCode"/"equals"). You will definitely have very long and awful debugging if you try.

It's like you swap books in the library. Index became unreliable. You search for "Bradbury", but find "Simak".

share|improve this answer
    
You should add that your observation only applies if the class overrides equals() and attribute k is used by it. (ie if the value of k affects equals()) –  Bohemian Apr 14 '12 at 16:06
    
@Bohemian Added phrase in round braces to avoid ambiguity. –  Vadim Ponomarev Apr 14 '12 at 16:24

If you were trying to look up the map using v.getk() it wouldn't find an entry, because you've changed the value return by the getter on v.

Or in other words, the map isn't magically kept in sync with what happens to your v object - it uses (and keeps using) the value given to it in the put().

share|improve this answer
    
" ... the map isn't magically kept in sync ... " - and one reason is that the map has no way of knowing that the key has changed, –  Stephen C Apr 14 '12 at 11:10

By calling v.setK(), you aren't changing the key in the HashMap. So you will simply have wrong information in your V object.

share|improve this answer
    
So, put() actually calls clone() on the key and stores it, yes? –  Hallucynogenyc Apr 14 '12 at 11:03
    
@Hallucynogenyc: No, not at all... Since you are using a HashMap, it simply uses the HashCode as identifier. –  Martijn Courteaux Apr 14 '12 at 11:05
    
Mmmm... if it only stores the hashCode of the Key, how comes I can retrieve the original keys? –  Hallucynogenyc Apr 14 '12 at 11:07
1  
@Hallucynogenyc - He did not say "it only stores the hashCode of the Key". –  Stephen C Apr 14 '12 at 11:12
1  
@Hallucynogenyc: No, it doesn't use clone. It simply stores the same instance of the Key object in the Entry array. –  Martijn Courteaux Apr 14 '12 at 11:13
V v = new V();
v.setK("a");
HashMap<K,V> map = new HashMap<K,V>();
map.put(v.getk(),v);

//Nothing will change in the hashmap with this step
v.setK("b");

but the problem will be while fetching the object V from map. If you call map.get(v.getk()), you will get null because the value in the map is mapped with object "a". However, since this String "a" is inter you can always fetch this object from map by map.get("a"); or

V v = new V();
v.setK("a");
map.get(v.getK());

PS: I have not tried to run this

share|improve this answer

The title of this question is misleading -- you are not changing the map key, as in mutating the object used as map key. When you say map.put(x, y), you are creating a map entry that aggregates two independent values: a key and a value. Where the key originates from is not seen by the map, it's just two objects. So, you have created a map entry ("a", v) and after that you just changed the state of v -- there is no way this could have influenced the map entry's key "a". If, on the other hand, you had an object K of your own making, like

public class K { 
  private String s;
  public K(String s) { this.s = s; }
  public void setS(String s) { this.s = s; }
  public boolean equals(Object o) { return ((K)o).s.equals(this.s); }
  public int hashCode() { return s.hashCode(); }

}

and now you do

final K k = new K("a");
map.put(k, v);
k.setS("b");
map.get(k);

then you would face the problem -- you mutated the object used as the map key.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, I read your question wrong. My answer does not fit the question. I will change it. –  Marko Topolnik Apr 14 '12 at 11:32
    
I fundamentally changed my answer. –  Marko Topolnik Apr 14 '12 at 11:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.