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$.each(data, function(i,item){
    var img = $('<img>');
    img.attr('src', item.thumb);
    img.attr('width', item.width);
    img.attr('height', item.height);
    o += '<li><a href="#">'+img+'<h3>'+item.title+'</h3><p>'+item.excerpt+'</p></a></li>';
});

The above outputs

li>[object] <h3>title</h3><p>excerpt</p></li>

My problem is with image tag. I understand that I am just appending a image object rather than the element... and using appendto would work but in the above scenario, in a loop, how do I accomplish this. Instead of displaying [object] how can display the image tag.

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3  
You are mixing DOM nodes and strings. That can't work. –  ThiefMaster Apr 14 '12 at 13:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

you have to get the html out of the object. there's a dozen or more ways to do that. one way is img[0].outerHTML which gives you the raw DOM element in the jQuery selector object, and then the outer html of that element.


$.each(data, function(i,item){
    var img = $('<img>');
    img.attr('src', item.thumb);
    img.attr('width', item.width);
    img.attr('height', item.height);
    o += '<li><a href="#">'+img[0].outerHTML+'<h3>'+item.title+'</h3><p>'+item.excerpt+'</p></a></li>';
});
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That is a poor way to modify the DOM. You should use normal DOM methods so you don't get into this mess.

However, if you must do it that way.

The problem caused is an object's toString() being implicitly called which is specified to return [object [[Class]] where [[Class]] is the internal class of the object. That's why you get [object Object] instead of the HTML of the img element.

You could get the outer HTML like so...

var imgOuterHtml = img.prop('outerHTML')
                   || '<img ' + 
                      []
                       .reduce
                       .call(img.prop('attributes'),
                             function(attrSerialised, attr) {
                                 return attrSerialised + 
                                        ' ' + attr.nodeName + 
                                        '="' + attr.nodeValue + '"';
                             },
                        '')
                       + '/>';

jsFiddle.

It also looks like you can use new XMLSerializer().serializeToString(element) if the outerHTML property does not exist, but it will only ever return XML, e.g. empty elements are always empty.

You could also create a temporary element such as a div, set its innerHTML and then get the outer div's innerHTML.

But, please, don't do it this way. Use jQuery's wrapped DOM modifying methods.

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