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In the following scenario:

class Person{
    public int ID;  
}

class Student extends Person{
    public int ID;
}

Student "hides ID field of person.

if we wanted to represent the following in the memory:

Student john = new Student();

would john object have two SEPARATE memory locations for storint Person.ID and its own?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Correct. Every class in your example has its own int ID id field.

You can read or assign values in this way from the sub classes:

super.ID = ... ; // when it is the direct sub class
((Person) this).ID = ... ; // when the class hierarchy is not one level only

Or externally (when they are public):

Student s = new Student();
s.ID = ... ; // to access the ID of Student
((Person) s).ID = ... ; to access the ID of Person
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That corresponds to my comment below: that means that Person, in the memory, takes up 8 bytes of space and has two memory locations holding two IDs right? –  Bober02 Apr 14 '12 at 14:55
    
yes, you have two IDs –  dash1e Apr 14 '12 at 14:57

Yes, as you can verify with:

class Student extends Person{
    public int ID;

    void foo() {
        super.ID = 1;
        ID = 2;
        System.out.println(super.ID);
        System.out.println(ID);
    }
}
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Yes, that is correct. There will be two distinct ints.

You can access Person's int in Student with:

super.ID;

Be careful though, dynamic dispatch doesn't happen for member fields. If you define a method on Person that uses the ID field, it will refer to Person's field, not Student's one even if called on a Student object.

public class A
{
    public int ID = 42;

    public void inheritedMethod()
    {
        System.out.println(ID);
    }
}

public class B extends A
{
    public int ID;

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        B b = new B();
        b.ID = 1;
        b.inheritedMethod();
    }
}

The above will print 42, not 1.

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Just to be sure, memory would have sth like: 120: 10 -> Person.ID 124: 99 -> this.ID but new Student() would only have 120: 10 –  Bober02 Apr 14 '12 at 14:36
    
I don't understand your comment. Student has its own ID, plus a second, distinct int, with the same name, inherited from Person. Those two ints do not share the same memory location and can be accessed independently. (Whether you should actually use this "feature" or not is debatable. It can be very confusing, especially with virtual methods.) –  Mat Apr 14 '12 at 14:39
    
Ok, all I wanteed to ask is whether the newly instantiated student object takes up 8 bytes of memory (two separate memory locations for both IDs) and student only takes 4 bytes of memory? –  Bober02 Apr 14 '12 at 14:51
    
I still don't understand, your comment contradicts itself. When you create a Student, you instantiate (more or less) all its class hierarchy. So you will use at least two int's worth of storage, one for the ID in Person, one for the ID in Student. –  Mat Apr 14 '12 at 14:54
    
That is what I meant, two ids for student :) and one for person :) –  Bober02 Apr 14 '12 at 14:58

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