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The code below doesn't work.

#include<iostream>
class Application
{
public:
    static int main(int argc, char** argv)
    {
        std::cin.get();
    }
};

I thought that static member functions are just the same as normal functions, and static WinMain works fine. Why doesn't static main work?

well, I think i somewhat got begin to understand, thank you for all the answers.

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4  
To say it bluntly, because this is a completely ridiculous way of defining main that only makes sense in the b̸r̸a̸i̸n̸d̸e̸a̸d̸ simpler purely-object-oriented languages. –  leftaroundabout Apr 14 '12 at 16:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Simply because the standard says so (3.6.1):

A program shall contain a global function called main. [...] The function shall not be overloaded.

What you have is a valid function, but it's not the program entry point.

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I like the simplicity in this answer. +1 –  dschulz Apr 14 '12 at 16:18

The following code will work just fine (Although there's no benefit to it that I can think off the top of my head)

#include<iostream>
class Application
{
public:
    static int main(int argc, char** argv)
    {
        std::cin.get();
        return 0;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    return Application::main(argc, argv);
}

Also note the main function in your original post is not main - its name is Application::main which is completely distinct from the global main - your compiler is expecting a function called main to exist in the global scope and not within a class or namespace.

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It is due to how the linkage on the program that is compiled. Basically, it can not find main due to scope.

The C++ standard details why you can't have a static main in the section "3.6 - Start and termination [basic.start]", specifically "3.6.1 - Main function [basic.start.main]". Where it says

All implementations shall allow both of the following definitions of main:

    int main() { /* ... */ }

and

    int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { /* ... */ }

A pdf of the standard is here. It is on page 69 of the pdf.

If you want your code like that to work you would need to do something such as

class Application
{
public:
    static int main(int argc, char** argv)
    {
        std::cin.get();
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    return Application::main(argc, argv);
}
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3  
static functions inside classes as in the code in the question do have external linkage. –  pmdj Apr 14 '12 at 16:07

In your code, the static member main() exists in the scope of the class, which is fine as long as you don't expect it to be the entry-point (or start) of your program.

The Standard requires the entry-point (i.e standard main()) to be defined in the global namespace. So you can do this:

int main(int argc, char** argv) //defined in the global namespace
{
    return Application::main(argc, argv);
}
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Let's say you have two classes, Application1 and Application2, both with public static functions called main, with the appropriate signatures. Which one should be picked? So that makes no sense.

The C++ standard defines the free function main (with 2 possible signatures, if I remember correctly - argc/argv and no arguments) as the entry point to the program. Implementations are free to add their own (e.g. WinMain). So basically, static class functions are simply not defined to be entry points in the standard.

You are of course free to forward your global main function's arguments to whatever internal main function you choose.

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