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I am new to opencl and there seems to be something about the barrier function I don't understand. This is the code for my kernel. This is a standard matrix vector calculation with the output in *w. there is 1 work group with 64 work units, the same as the dimension of the vector

#pragma OPENCL EXTENSION cl_khr_fp64 : enable
__kernel void fmin_stuff(__global double *h, __global double *g, __global double  
  *w,int n,__global int * gid) {

// Get the index of the current element
int i = get_global_id(0);
int j;
gid[i]=get_local_id(0);

w[i]=-g[i];
barrier(CLK_GLOBAL_MEM_FENCE | CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);
for (j=0;j<n;j++)
{
  if (j<i)
    w[i]-=h[i+j*n]*w[j];
  barrier(CLK_GLOBAL_MEM_FENCE | CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);
}
}

The problem is that the code fails at random. The output is correct for a while. Here are the initial values for w for each run.

-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.34999 2.51524 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.10141 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.72261 2.80155 
-0.148351 -0.309007 0.133204 -1.39589 2.88335 -2.68636 2.77369 

The program reports that the kernel executed successfully in each case. For all runs the values in the vector w are eventually incorrect. any advice would be greatly appreciated.

There was some confusion over whether this is a simple matrix multiplication. It is not. this is what the code is trying to accomplish where I include olnly the first 5 terms of w.

w(1)=-g(1);
w(2)=-g(2);
w(3)=-g(3);
w(4)=-g(4);
w(5)=-g(5);

w(2)-=h(2)*w(1);
w(3)-=h(3)*w(1);
w(4)-=h(4)*w(1);
w(5)-=h(5)*w(1);

w(3)-=h(3+N)*w(2);
w(4)-=h(4+N)*w(2);
w(5)-=h(5+N)*w(2);

w(4)-=h(4+2*N)*w(3);
w(5)-=h(5+2*N)*w(3);

w(5)-=h(5+3*N)*w(4);

Also the kernel is only called once per program run. The random behaviour results from running the program mutiple times.

The comment led me to see what I was doing wrong. I had the work groups and items configured as

size_t global_item_size[3] = {N, 1, 1}; // Process the entire lists
size_t local_item_size[3] = {1,1,1}; // Process in groups of 64
ret = clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(command_queue, kernel, 1, NULL,
        global_item_size, local_item_size, 0, NULL, NULL);

when it should have been.

size_t global_item_size[3] = {N, 1, 1}; // Process the entire lists
size_t local_item_size[3] = {N,1,1}; // Process in groups of 64
ret = clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(command_queue, kernel, 1, NULL,
        global_item_size, local_item_size, 0, NULL, NULL);

Thanks for the help. This is great for me but probably not of much interest to to others.

share|improve this question
    
The important thing to take away from this is that the barrier function in OpenCL kernels will only act as a barrier for the workgroup and not for the entire device. Device-wide synchronizations on the GPU are a topic of active research. –  KLee1 Apr 15 '12 at 7:56
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2 Answers

Can you, please detail, why do you need both the global_id and the local_id inside your kernel?

If you have only one work-group, then the local_id should be enough.

Also, why do you copy the data from g into w?

Are you trying to achieve more than simply: w=h*g, where h is the matrix and g the vector?

Finally, if you are not simply re-launching your application multiple times but simply you are launching the kernel multiple times in a single application, it seems that the most likely explanation is that you corrupt the memory somewhere, ie. you are overwriting the input data.

Can you check if the input data passed to the kernel is consistent at the same run?

share|improve this answer
    
I pass the local_id back to the calling routine just to see that there is only one work group. This is not a matrix multiply. –  dave fournier Apr 14 '12 at 18:34
    
Seeing your edit to the original question, I understand that the underlying cause was that you had more than one work-group, so that barrier() could not synchronize work-items belonging to different work-groups (as KLee1 suggested). Instead of having 1 (barrier-synchronized) work-group of 64 work-items, you had 64 (unsynchronized) work-groups of 1 work-item. Is that correct? –  axeoth Apr 20 '12 at 1:49
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First of all you do not need to use CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE in your case.

However i would recommend to copy

  1. global -> local
  2. work with local data
  3. copy local -> global

In this case you will need CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE

Now back to your problem. From what I see, problem can occur if different items in Work Group execute this line:

w[i]-=h[i+j*n]*w[j];

not simultaneously. Imagine one work item already computed value for w[i] and then other work item accesses w[j]. Then, in case "j" of our second work item is same as "i" of first , other work item will use on its first iteration value which was already updater by first work item.

What you should do is next (in case you still want to use global memory):

I also assume n < N (your work group size), otherwise no synchronization possible, because you span though several work groups

for (j=0;j<n;j++)
{
    double wj;
    if (j<i)
        wj = w[j];
    barrier(CLK_GLOBAL_MEM_FENCE); // read_mem_fence(CLK_GLOBAL_MEM_FENCE) is enough
    if(j<i)
        w[i]-=h[i+j*n]*wj;
    barrier(CLK_GLOBAL_MEM_FENCE);  // write_mem_fence(CLK_GLOBAL_MEM_FENCE) is enough
}

Hope this helps

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