Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Consider we have two tables ProductType and ProductSizeGroup as below

ProductType

Id 
Name
MaleSizeGroupId
FemaleSizeGroupId
ChildSizeGroupId

ProductSizeGroup

Id
Name

Each of MaleSizeGroupId, FemaleSizeGroupId and ChildSizeGroupId fields should be FKs to ProductSizeGroup.Id.

I add one using the following statement:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[ProductType]  
WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT
    [FK_ProductType_ProductSizeGroup_Male] FOREIGN KEY([MaleGroupId]) 
    REFERENCES [dbo].[ProductSizeGroup] ([Id])

This works fine. I try to add the next using

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[ProductType]
WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT
    [FK_ProductType_ProductSizeGroup_Female] FOREIGN KEY([FemaleGroupId]) 
    REFERENCES [dbo].[ProductSizeGroup] ([Id])

But I get the error:

The ALTER TABLE statement conflicted with the FOREIGN KEY constraint "FK_ProductType_ProductSizeGroup_Female". The conflict occurred in database "dbname", table "dbo.ProductSizeGroup", column 'Id'.

So there is conflict.. but what conflict? What should I be looking for?

share|improve this question
1  
Is there existing data in the tables? Is there a value in FemaleGroupId that is not in ProductSizeGroup.Id? – Oded Apr 14 '12 at 18:09
    
Exactly the problem - didn't realise data was still in the tables (thought they had been cleaned down). Seems obvious now! Thank you for your help. – glosrob Apr 14 '12 at 18:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

That just means: there are rows in your table ProductType that have values in the FemaleGroupId column which do not exist in the referenced table (ProductSizeGroup).

It's not a problem per se - you can totally have multiple columns going from one table to another.

The problem is with the existing data - you have data in there that doesn't live up to that FK constraint. Fix that data and you should be fine.

To find those offending rows, use a query like this:

SELECT * 
FROM [dbo].[ProductType]
WHERE FemaleGroupId NOT IN (SELECT DISTINCT Id FROM [dbo].[ProductSizeGroup])

That will list all offending rows - update their attribute and get going again!

share|improve this answer
1  
As per my comment above - this was indeed the problem. I thought tables had been cleared of their data. Seems obvious, thanks for your help. – glosrob Apr 14 '12 at 18:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.