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I am defining a function

def update(dictionary,key,value):
    dictionary[key] = value
   #  if i do print dictionary... it still shows the original value?

I want to update the input dictionary in the main call

So this is the main function i wrote:

def update_mapping(mapping_dict,check_word,solution_word):
    #print "here "
    #new_mapping_dict = {}
    for i,ele in enumerate(check_word):
        if mapping_dict.has_key(ele):
            if mapping_dict[ele] == "*":
                mapping_dict[ele] = solution_word[i]

                print ele, solution_word
    print mapping_dict,check_word,solution_word

Basically I am inputting a misspelled word and then misspelled word has some mapping.. I do that mapping in the dictionary.. Like

 mapping_dict ={"a":"x"...."s":"*"...}

So all the known alphabets whose mapping have been found have a legit key value alphabet pairs.. for the alphabets for which I havent found the right mapping, I am replacing them with "*" and I am finding them with some algorithm (inverted index)

And as i found those, I want to update my dictionary?

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3  
Show us more context! The code you've supplied so far looks fine (although I personally wouldn't have put that in a function, since it's quite obvious what the wrapped line does). –  Cameron Apr 14 '12 at 18:25
    
More on Cameron, if update dictionary keys is as simple as updating one key-value pair at a time, just do my_dict[key] = value, it is more efficient. –  CppLearner Apr 14 '12 at 18:29
    
Hi. THanks for comments.. but that was just an example.. I am doing some more checks :) –  Fraz Apr 14 '12 at 18:30
    
I don't any problem. I've ran your code. It did change the content of s to something else. See the live example here: codepad.org/ACxleA2L Make sure your intention are correct and you are reading the right outputs. –  CppLearner Apr 14 '12 at 18:49
    
THanks everyone. yeah the bug was somewhere else –  Fraz Apr 14 '12 at 20:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
>>> test = {"test": 1}
>>> def update(dictionary,key,value):
...     dictionary[key] = value
... 
>>> update(test, "test", 2)
>>> test
{'test': 2}

Your problem must be elsewhere - this works.

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