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Here is my scenarion:

I have a GridControl bound to a BindingList. At first what I was doing was creating a worker thread and access the BindingList directly, but this was throwing a "Cross-thread operation detected", so I followed the guide here:

http://www.devexpress.com/Support/Center/p/AK2981.aspx

By cloning the original BindingList into the worker thread and changing that one, I got the desired effect. However, I recently implemeneted the INotifyPropertyChanged into the object that is held into the BindingList, and I started getting the error again.

My guess is that the GridView is still listening to the INotifyPropertyChanged from the object.

How can I fix this?

My class:

public class Proxy : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you are manipulating the UI from outside of the UI thread (such as from a worker thread), then you need to rejoin the UI thread. You can do this by calling Invoke on the UI control. You can test if this is required by using InvokeRequired.

The pattern typically used is this:

public void ChangeText(string text)
{
   if(this.InvokeRequired)
   {
      this.Invoke(new Action(() => ChangeText(text)));
   }
   else
   {
      label.Text = text;  
   }
}

In your case the UI is being manipulated as a result of INotifyPropertyChanged, so you need to make sure that either you always modify your entity on the UI thread (using the above technique), or use a generic asynchronous INotifyPropertyChanged helper. This is a wrapper around the item being bound. It uses the above technique to ensure the ChangeProperty event fires on the UI thread.

Here's a very crude example of a proxy for an Entity class. This ensures that the property change event rejoins the UI thread, and keeps the entity itself unmodified. Obviously you'll probably want to implement this more generically using DynamicObject for instance.

public class NotificationHelper : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private readonly ISynchronizeInvoke invokeDelegate;
    private readonly Entity entity;

    public NotificationHelper(ISynchronizeInvoke invokeDelegate, Entity entity)
    {
       this.invokeDelegate = invokeDelegate;
       this.entity = entity;

       entity.PropertyChanged += OnPropertyChanged;
    }

    public string Name
    {
       get { return entity.Name; }
    }

    private void OnPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
           if (invokeDelegate.InvokeRequired)
           {
               invokeDelegate.Invoke(new PropertyChangedEventHandler(OnPropertyChanged),
                                     new[] { sender, e });
               return;
           }
           PropertyChanged(this, e);
        }
     }
 }
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hmm.... So i need to place this in the INotifyPropertyChanged event? I have updated the question with my class code. –  TheGateKeeper Apr 14 '12 at 20:29
    
I've updated to clarify, either only change the bound object on the UI thread, or wrap it in a helper class when binding. –  TheCodeKing Apr 14 '12 at 20:48
    
Didn't use this, but marked it as answer as it provides a lot of detail. –  TheGateKeeper Apr 14 '12 at 21:00
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Just in case someone has run into the same problem... I managed to fix it after some hours. Here is what I did:

Basically the problem was that the object implementing INotifyPropertyChanged was living in a worker thread, and this causes problems when accessing the UI thread.

So what I did was pass a reference to the object that needs to be updated to the INotifyPropertyChanged object, and then use invoke on it.

Here is what it looks like:

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            //If the Proxy object is living in a non-UI thread, use invoke
            if (c != null)
            {
                c.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name))));
            }
            //Otherwise update directly
            else
            {
                handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
            }

        }
    }

    //Use this to reference the object on the UI thread when there is need to
    public Control C
    {
        set { c = value; }
    }

From the thread, all I did was:

                    prox.c = this;
                    //Logic here
                    prox.c = null;

Hope this helps someone!!

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1  
This is a bit dirty as it means your business object has references to UI. Better to use a wrapper class, see the link in the other answer. –  TheCodeKing Apr 14 '12 at 20:50
    
Thanks for the update, but I think you still need to pass a reference to the object one way or the other. this.Invoke(new Action(() => ChangeText(text))); for example, would need this to be the actual control. –  TheGateKeeper Apr 14 '12 at 20:59
    
I am very new to threading so this is all very new to me, I can't even understand that code you linked. I think I will stick to my way for now. –  TheGateKeeper Apr 14 '12 at 21:00
    
The idea is the wrapper takes a reference to the control and the object being bound and acts as a proxy for events to rejoin the UI thread. I'll try and update with an example. –  TheCodeKing Apr 14 '12 at 21:02
    
But don't you still need to refernence the object? Isn't it the same as my implementation? –  TheGateKeeper Apr 14 '12 at 21:06
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