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I'm having a hard time with the following;

There is a word file with questions and answers that I need to import in moodle (online question site) in a particular format. Everything is black accept for the right answers, these are green. The start format is the following:

1. Question example

a. Wrong

b. Wrong

C. Wrong

D. Right

The output should become

:Question example

:Question example

{

~ Wrong

~ Wrong

~ Wrong

= Right

}

I open the file in word replace all red paragraph marks (I can't do a replace with groups) with *. After that I export the .docx file to text. Open in on my linux computer and throw the following regex on it.

sed -i -e 's/^\r/\n/g' tmp #OS X white line replacement                    
sed -i -e 's/\r//g' tmp #remove white lines                           
sed -i -e 's:^[a-z]\.:~:' tmp #Replace Leading question letters with tilde                                                                                               
sed -i -e 's/\(^[0-9]*\.\ \)\(.*\)/}\n::\2\n::\2\n{/' tmp #regenerate tittle                    
sed -i -n '${p;q};N;/\n\*/{s/"\?\n//p;b};P;D' tmp #next line starts with * append to front of current                                                              
sed -i -e 's:^~\(.*\)\(\*.*\)$:=\1:' tmp #move * from back to = to front
sed -i -e 's:^\*:=:' tmp #replace any remaining * with =        
sed '/^$/d' tmp #delete any remaining white lines 

This isn't great but works well, questions are hand-made and have a lot of errors so I still have to walk trough this by hand. The hard part is when I have multiple correct answers. The output should become like the following;

:Question example

:Question example

{

~%-100% Wrong

~%-100% Wrong

~%50% Right

~%50% Right

}

Ideally I have a sed or perl regex that counts the amount of = sings between { and replaces them with ~%50%. And all the ~ sings with %-100%. I can have this code also for 3 right answers where every right answer becomes ~%33%.

Is this doable? I have over 1000 questions and it would sure help to automate this. Multiline replacement with sed is kind of tricky with two lines so I guess four or more lines will need perl? I have no experience in Perl.

Could someone help me out with this one? Please excuse my bad English i'm a non-native speaker.

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Look up sed hold space operations; it seems tricky but I guess it's possible using those. –  Lev Levitsky Apr 14 '12 at 21:52
    
What are you doing about the different newlines between Windows and Linux? Also what about all of the characters that Word "corrects" for you, like quotes? –  stark Apr 14 '12 at 22:52
    
It would help a lot if you showed some real-life examples. It is hard to tell from your example which text is real and which is placeholders. Does Wrong and Right appear in the source file? If so, how to tell which answers are right and which wrong? If not, what is the point of them in the output file? –  Borodin Apr 14 '12 at 23:05
    
I was easily able to find out that this format is called GIFT. docs.moodle.org/22/en/GIFT –  Kaz Apr 16 '12 at 5:54
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4 Answers

my $file = do { local $/; <> };
my @questions = split /(?<=.)(?=[0-9]+\.)/s, $file;
for (@questions) {
   my @lines = split /^/m;

   my $title = shift(@lines);
   $title =~ s/^\S+\s*/:/;

   my $num_right;
   my $num_wrong;
   for (@lines) {
      if    (/Right/) { ++$num_right; }
      elsif (/Wrong/) { ++$num_wrong; }
   }

   my $num_answers = $num_right + $num_wrong;

   my $right_pct = sprintf('%.0f', $num_right/$num_answers*100);
   my $right_prefix = $num_right == 1 ? "=" : "~%$right_pct%";
   my $wrong_prefix = $num_right == 1 ? "~" : "~%-100%";

   for (@lines) {
      if    (/Right/) { s/^\S+/$right_prefix/; }
      elsif (/Wrong/) { s/^\S+/$wrong_prefix/; }
   }

   print(
      $title,
      "\n",
      $title,
      "\n{\n",
      @lines,
      "\n}\n",
   );
}

Replace /Right/ and /Wrong/ with something appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
After editing you have introduced a missing , after the first newline in the print statement. And the conditional operator should use $num_right instead of $num_wrong when determining the prefixes. –  Borodin Apr 14 '12 at 23:58
    
Fixed, thanks.. –  ikegami Apr 15 '12 at 0:44
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This might work for you:

cat <<\! >file.sed
> # On encountering a digit in the first character position
> /^[0-9]/{
>   # Create a label to cater for last line processing
>   :end
>   # Swap to hold space
>   x
>   # Check hold space for contents.
>   # If none delete it and begin a new cycle
>   # This is to cater for the first question line
>   /./!d
>   # Remove any carriage returns
>   s/\r//g
>   # Remove any blank lines
>   s/\n\n*/\n/g
>   # Double the question line, replacing the question number by a ':'
>   # Also append a { followed by a newline
>   s/^[0-9]*\.\([^\n]*\n\)/:\1:\1{\n/
>   # Coalesce lines beginning with a * and remove optional preceeding "
>   s/"\?\n\*/*/g
>   # Replace the wrong answers a,b,c...  with ~%-100%
>   s/\n[a-zA-z]*\. \(Wrong\)/\n~%-100% \1/g
>   # Replace the right answers a,B,c... with ~%100%
>   s/\n[a-zA-Z]*\. \(Right\)/\n~%100% \1/g
>   # Assuming no more than 4 answers:
>   # Replace 4 correct answers prefix with ~%25%
>   s/\(~%100%\)\(.*\)\1\(.*\)\1\(.*\)\1/~%25%\2~%25%\3~%25%\4~%25%/
>   # Replace 3 correct answers prefix with ~%33%
>   s/\(~%100%\)\(.*\)\1\(.*\)\1/~%33%\2~%33%\3~%33%/
>   # Replace 2 correct answers prefix with ~%50%
>   s/\(~%100%\)\(.*\)\1/~%50%\2~%50%/
>   # Append a newline and a }
>   s/$/\n}/
>   # Break and so print newly formatted string
>   b
>   }
> # Append pattern space to hold space
> H
> # On last line jump to end label
> $b end
> # Delete all lines from pattern space
> d
> !

Then run:

sed -f file.sed file
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The program below works according to my best guess at what it is you need. It works by reading all the information into an array and then formatting it.

As it stands, the data is incorporated into the source and read from the DATA file handle. Changing the loop to while (<>) { ... } will allow you to specify a data file on the command line.

You must correct me if my guesses are wrong.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @questions;

while (<DATA>) {
  next unless /\S/;
  s/\s+$//;
  if (/^\d+\.\s*(.+)/) {
    push @questions, [$1];
  }
  elsif (/^[A-Za-z]\.\s*(.+)/i) {
    push @{$questions[-1]}, $1;
  }
}

for my $question (@questions) {

  my ($text, @answers) = @$question;

  print "::$text\n" for 1, 2;

  my $correct = grep /right/i, @answers;
  my $percent = int(100/$correct);

  print "{\n";

  if ($correct == 1) {
    printf "%s %s\n", /right/i ? '=' : '~', $_ for @answers;
  }
  else {
    my $percent = int(100/$correct);
    printf "~%%%d%%~ %s\n", /right/i ? $percent : -100, $_ for @answers;
  }

  print "}\n";
}

__DATA__
1. Question one

a. Wrong

b. Wrong

c. Right

d. Wrong

2. Question two

a. Right

b. Wrong

c. Right

d. Wrong

3. Question three

a. Right

b. Right

c. Wrong

d. Right

output

::Question one
::Question one
{
~ Wrong
~ Wrong
= Right
~ Wrong
}
::Question two
::Question two
{
~%50%~ Right
~%-100%~ Wrong
~%50%~ Right
~%-100%~ Wrong
}
::Question three
::Question three
{
~%33%~ Right
~%33%~ Right
~%-100%~ Wrong
~%33%~ Right
}
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Your examples do not match this documentation: http://docs.moodle.org/22/en/GIFT. Questions titles and questiosn are delimited by two colons not one colon:

//Comment line 
::Question title 
:: Question {
=A correct answer
~Wrong answer1
#A response to wrong answer1
~Wrong answer2
#A response to wrong answer2
~Wrong answer3
#A response to wrong answer3
~Wrong answer4
#A response to wrong answer4
}

Some people naively gave you answers based on your examples instead of finding the real spec, oops.

Your question is not possible to answer because your format does not reveal which are the correct answers. That is to say:

1. Question

a. Is this right?

b. Or this?

c. Or this?

You say that these are identified using colors in the original Word document and that you do some replacement on that to preserve the information; however, you don't show an example of this! Oops ...

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