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I have an sqlite database (on android) where I want to store the latest N entries of some data.

The primary key of the table is a date field. Basically whenever I insert some row after the threshold is reached, I want to delete the oldest entry from the table.

Is there any especially clever/nice way to do this? Note that I always check the invariant (nr rows <= THRESHOLD) after each insert so we don't have to deal with anything but with deleting the oldest entry.

What I'm planning to do is basically:

  1. insert data
  2. if count(*) of table <= THRESHOLD: goto 4
  3. DELETE FROM table WHERE date == (SELECT date from table order by date ASC LIMIT 1);
  4. DONE

Note I'm using ORMlite, but since there's no user data involved I can just use raw SQL, so there shouldn't be a problem.

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Doesn't this violate the single value subquery rule? 3.DELETE FROM table WHERE date == (SELECT date from table order by date ASC); –  Chris Gessler Apr 14 '12 at 22:35
    
@Chris There should at least be a limit 1 in there yes. But it should be considered pseudo code - I'm still thinking about how to best implement it - I just thought some code would make it easier to understand. –  Voo Apr 14 '12 at 22:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use a trigger to delete the oldest row when a new row is added, and the number of rows is over your threshold.

The count of rows can be kept in a separate accounting table to avoid a COUNT on every insert.

Here's a complete example:

create table bookkeepings (bk_name text primary key, bk_value integer not null);

insert or replace into bookkeepings values ('Max Results', 50);
insert or replace into bookkeepings values ('Qty Results', 0);

create table results
  (r_timestamp text primary key default (datetime(current_timestamp)),
   result text);

create trigger results_limit_trigger before insert on results"
  for each row"
  when (select bk_value from bookkeepings where bk_name = 'Qty Results')
    >= (select bk_value from bookkeepings where bk_name = 'Max Results')
  begin
    delete from results
      where r_timestamp = (select r_timestamp from results order by r_timestamp limit 1);
  end;

create trigger results_count_insert_trigger after insert on results
  for each row
  begin
    update bookkeepings set bk_value = bk_value + 1 where bk_name = 'Qty Results';
  end;

create trigger results_count_delete_trigger after delete on results
  for each row
  begin
    update bookkeepings set bk_value = bk_value - 1 where bk_name = 'Qty Results';
  end;
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DELETE FROM table WHERE date = (SELECT MAX(date) from table LIMIT 1);
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Ah MAX is a good idea yes - clearer in intent and most likely faster as well. But the overall structure can't be improved? Having to do 4 queries for this seems quite roundabout. –  Voo Apr 14 '12 at 22:45
1  
Why INSERT and DELETE? Perhaps an UPDATE on MIN(datetime) to overwrite the oldest entry with the new data and a current datetime? –  Sam Apr 14 '12 at 22:47
    
@Sam Interesting idea. Never even thought about updating the complete record. Probably not more efficient than insert/delete (since we still have to reorder the table), but I'll try that too. –  Voo Apr 14 '12 at 22:56

How about this?

-- keep the last N records by expiration date
declare @expDate datetime

set @expDate = (select top 100 max(dt) from table order by dt asc);
delete from table where dt > @expDate
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