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I am trying to write a DSL

I have methods that return strings but if I want to combine the strings I need to use a + symbol but I would like to call the methods together but I'm unsure how to achieve it

I have methods at the moment such as

MyStaticClass.Root() MyStaticClass.And() MyStaticClass.AnyInt() which return strings

I would like to be able to do

Root().And().AnyInt() which result in a string

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The methods should return a wrapper class. The methods are also instance methods of the wrapper class. Example:

class Fluent
{
     private string _value;
     public Fluent And()
     {
         this._value += "whatever";
         return this;
     }
     public Fluent AnyInt()
     {
         this._value += "42";
         return this;
     }
     public override string ToString() { return _value; }
}

You could also define an implicit or explicit conversion from Fluent to string, rather than (or in addition to) the ToString() override.

Also, for production code, I'd use a string builder to avoid many calls to Concat.

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String builder append? What would an implicit conversion look like to get the result out? Is this thread safe also? –  Jon Apr 14 '12 at 23:08
1  
public static implicit operator string(Fluent f) { return f.ToString(); }. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z5z9kes2.aspx –  Markus Jarderot Apr 14 '12 at 23:24
    
@Jon, Unless you plan to use the same instance from multiple threads, thread-safety is not an issue you should worry about. Fluent interfaces is normally used in a single method, and then discarded. –  Markus Jarderot Apr 14 '12 at 23:28

You don't need to use + symbol. Use StringBuilder http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.text.stringbuilder.aspx

EXAMPLE

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
builder.Append("One string ").Append("Second string").Append("Another string");
string final = builder.ToString();  

If you want a simple custom FluentInterface use the following:

public class MyOwnStringBuilder
{
   public StringBuilder Builder;


   public MyOwnStringBuilder()
   {
      this.Builder = new StringBuilder();
   }

   public static MyOwnStringBuilder Root
   {
     get{return new MyOwnStringBuilder();}
   }

   public string End
   {
     get{return Builder.ToString();}
   }

   public MyOwnStringBuilder And(string value)
   {
     Builder.Append(value);
     return this;
   }

   public MyOwnStringBuilder AnyInt(string value)
   {
      Builder.Append(value);
      return this;
   }
}

You would use it:

MyOwnStringBuilder.Root
       .And("some value")
       .AnyInt("some new value")
       .End;

Regards.

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You would always need to call end though? Also this is for a web app so is it thread safe. Not sure how statics work for thread safety –  Jon Apr 14 '12 at 23:05
    
Nice answer; I'd rename the class however :-) –  phoog Apr 14 '12 at 23:06
    
yes you should call End, and there is not issues with thread safety. @phoog i named it after the proposed one in the question, but yes it would be better to rename it. –  Matija Grcic Apr 14 '12 at 23:07
    
Thanks for the answer. I don't like having to call End every time though. I guess not much choice though –  Jon Apr 14 '12 at 23:10
    
End() it so after N chains you tell the class to return the value. For such simple fluentinterfaces as this it's a best practice approach to have Root() or Start() and End(). Look at StringBuilder, you can chain until you call ToString() which is basically a End() call. Accept as answer as i provided everything you wanted. –  Matija Grcic Apr 14 '12 at 23:13

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