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Sometimes when I am programming in C++/C I end up calling the same function multiple times and I was wondering what is the most efficient way to check for errors for all of those calls? Using if else statements take up a lot of code and look ugly. I have come up with my own way of checking for errors, perhaps there is a better way that I should use.

int errs[5] = {0};
errs[0] = functiona(...);
errs[1] = functiona(...);
...
errs[5] = functiona(...);
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
  if (err[i] == 0)
     MAYDAY!_wehaveanerror();
}

Note: I understand that using try and catch might be better for C++ as it would solve this problem by throwing an exception on the first error, but the problem with that is that it is not compatible with a lot of functions that return error codes such as the Windows API. Thanks!

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1  
Haha, updated my question :) –  user99545 Apr 14 '12 at 23:39
2  
Why wouldn't you want to know as soon as possible when an error occurred, and check each return code as you get it? Using your method, you could generate a sequence of errors, and only find out about the first. –  Scott Hunter Apr 14 '12 at 23:40
    
Iterate over the list of paramaters you will pass, call the function with that iteration's parameters, set a "we have an error" bool to true the first time an error is detected, and terminate the loop right then and there. –  DavidO Apr 14 '12 at 23:43
    
Additionally: Just because a Windows API function only returns error codes doesn't mean you can't throw upon receiving an error code. –  DavidO Apr 14 '12 at 23:44
1  
@ScottHunter I would like to do that which is why I am asking my question about how to find a neat way to do it. My code calls the same function GetPrivateProfileStringA about 40 times to load the settings for my program. That means there are 40 if statements and 40 then statements plus the handler which is very ugly. –  user99545 Apr 14 '12 at 23:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If...IF the function has a chance to throw a different error you should also add a catch all.

struct my_exception : public std::exception {
    my_exception(int); /* ... */ };

int main()
{
    try
    {
        int e;
        if ((e = function()) != SUCCESS) { throw my_exception(e); }
        if ((e = function()) != SUCCESS) { throw my_exception(e); }
        if ((e = function()) != SUCCESS) { throw my_exception(e); }
    }
    catch (my_exception & e)
    {
        std::cerr << "Something went wrong: " << e.what() << "\n";
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        //Error Checking
    }
}
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You could write some pseudo-C++ like this:

struct my_exception : public std::exception {
    my_exception(int); /* ... */ };

int main()
{
    try
    {
        int e;
        if ((e = function()) != SUCCESS) { throw my_exception(e); }
        if ((e = function()) != SUCCESS) { throw my_exception(e); }
        if ((e = function()) != SUCCESS) { throw my_exception(e); }
    }
    catch (my_exception & e)
    {
        std::cerr << "Something went wrong: " << e.what() << "\n";
    }
}
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Or you could wrap the Windows API function with a thin layer that converts the error codes into exceptions. Borland Delphi had done this 15 years ago, it worked great and still works great. –  Roland Illig Apr 15 '12 at 6:44

What about handling the checking in a function?

void my_function() {
  if (!create_window())
    throw Error("Failed to create window");
}

int main() {
  try {
    my_function();
  } catch (const Error& e) {
    cout << e.msg << endl;
  } catch (...) {
    cout << "Unknown exception caught\n"
  }

  return 0;
}
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If you're calling the same function over and over again, the most succinct way might be to use a macro. I would suggest something like:

#define CHECKERROR(x) if(x == 0) wehaveanerror()

CHECKERROR(function(...));
CHECKERROR(function(...));

Obviously, this macro would be very specific to the particular function and error handler involved, so it may be prudent to undef it after those calls.

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Doing it more old-school, but keeping w/ the original error response but responding as soon as an error occurs w/o looking ugly:

#define callcheck(r) if ((r)==0) MAYDAY!_wehaveanerror()

callcheck(functiona(...));
callcheck(functiona(...));
...
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