Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to retrieve all of the numbers of system calls and eventually the names of the system calls called by a give program using ptrace. I am on a 64 bit system so I am using the ORIG_RAX * 8 to find system calls using ptrace. I currently can only retrieve the first system call, output of a sample run is below. Any ideas?

Thanks!

Output: griffinm@well $ g++ mystrace.cc

~/cs153/assn2
griffinm@well $ a.out ls
Please wait
The child made a system call 59
a.out  mystrace.cc  mystrace.cc~
Number of machine instructions : 252376
~/cs153/assn2



#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <sys/ptrace.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#define ORIG_RAX 120 

int main( int argc, char* argv[])
{
        long long counter = 0;  /*  machine instruction counter */
        int wait_val;           /*  child's return value        */
        int pid; 
    long orig_eax;               /*  child's process id          */

        puts("Please wait");

    switch (pid = fork()) {
    case -1:
            perror("fork");
            break;
    case 0:
            ptrace(PTRACE_TRACEME, 0, 0, 0);

            execvp(argv[1],  NULL);

            break;

    default:
            wait(&wait_val); 

    orig_eax = ptrace(PTRACE_PEEKUSER,
                      pid, ORIG_RAX,
                      NULL);
    printf("The child made a "
           "system call %ld\n", orig_eax);

            while (wait_val == 1407 ) {
                    counter++;

                    if (ptrace(PTRACE_SINGLESTEP, pid, 0, 0) != 0)
                            perror("ptrace");

                    wait(&wait_val);

            }

    }
    printf("Number of machine instructions : %lld\n", counter);
    return 0;

}

Update Default Case:
Default:     
            wait(&wait_val); 


            while (wait_val == 1407 ) {
                    counter++;

                    if (ptrace(PTRACE_SYSCALL, pid, 0, 0) != 0)
                            perror("ptrace");
         orig_eax = ptrace(PTRACE_PEEKUSER,
                      pid, 8*ORIG_RAX,
                      NULL);
        cout<<orig_eax<<endl;
                    wait(&wait_val);

            }

    }

Edit:

Output:

griffinm@well $ a.out pwd
Please wait
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
/home/csmajs/griffinm/cs153/assn2
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1

I think the 8*Orig_RAX is the problem, the machine is 64 bit like I said. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
You should not be hard-coding the number 1407 to compare the return value of wait(2) against—that's an implementation detail. Instead, you should be testing while (WIFSTOPPED(wait_val) && WSTOPSIG(wait_val) == SIGTRAP). –  Adam Rosenfield Apr 15 '12 at 2:24
    
Thanks! My professor gave us some skeleton code with that for the while loop condition. I had a feeling there was a way to make it more general. –  Marty Griffin Apr 15 '12 at 3:05
add comment

1 Answer

You probably want to use PTRACE_SYSCALL instead of PTRACE_SINGLESTEP to run the child up to the next system call rather than just a single instruction. Then you can use the PTRACE_PEEKUSER again to see what syscall it is.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that and posted the updated results in my original question –  Marty Griffin Apr 15 '12 at 3:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.