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I'm helping build an Android application that is in synchronization with a Ruby on Rails application. We are working with Android 2.2 and Rails 3.x and Apache on Ubuntu.

This is something that is very new to me. You can register and login from the Android device. In both of these cases a username and password are sent to the server. In other cases where there is synchronization with the Rails application and Android, when a user is logged in, an authentication token is tagged to the end of the URLs. The creation and authentication of these tokens is handled with Devise.

My question is this: What would be the best way to secure the passing of usernames, passwords, and tokens back and forth between Rails an the Android device?

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What about using encrypted communication, for example SSL (HTTPS)? It is fairly easy to configure Apache for HTTPS communication and it is also natively supported on Android devices.

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This is an idea that I have thought about and briefly looked into. One thing that came up was SSL certificates and self-signed vs. paying. Is there any way to avoid paying a lot of money for an SSL certificate to implement this? And, does SSL secure information between the browser/device and the Apache server? –  groffcole May 7 '12 at 14:33
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About the certificate issue: there are some widely recognized Certificate Authorities that are issuing SSL certificates without any charge, take a look at for example StartSSL. And for your second question, yes, SSL will secure information between the device and the Apache server. –  buc May 8 '12 at 9:11
    
Thanks! Sorry for my slow response, I was finishing up a school semester and got distracted. –  groffcole May 9 '12 at 21:05

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