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Why do 1, 2, and 3 work when 4 generates a segmentation fault? (See below.)

char c[10];
char* d;

1.

scanf("%s", &c);
printf("%s\n", &c);

2.

scanf("%s", c);
printf("%s\n", c);

3.

scanf("%s", &d);
printf("%s\n", &d);

4.

scanf("%s", d);
printf("%s\n", d);
share|improve this question
3  
What do you think? Right now it looks like you're trying to get us to do your homework for you. – templatetypedef Apr 15 '12 at 0:37
    
Tagged as homework; if I'm wrong, feel free to remove the tag. – mc10 Apr 15 '12 at 0:39
    
This is not homework. I am just preparing for an interview and ran into this problem while trying to make a program that generates permutations. – Ivan Apr 15 '12 at 1:04
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Repeating the code in the question:

char c[10];
char* d;

1.

scanf("%s", &c);
printf("%s\n", &c);

This is likely to work as expected, but in fact the behavior is undefined.

scanf with a "%s" format requires an argument of type char*. &c is of type char (*)[10], i.e., it's a pointer to a char[10] array. It points to the same location in memory as the address of the 0th element of c, but it's of a different type. The same thing happens with the printf: the "%s" format tells it to expect a char* argument, but you're passing it a char(*)[10] argument.

Since scanf is a variadic function, there's no required type checking for arguments other than the format string. The compiler will (probably) happily pass the char (*)[10] value to scanf, assuming that it can handle it. And it probably can, on an implementation where all pointers have the same size, representation, and argument-passing mechanism. But, for example, a C compiler for an exotic architecture could easily make char* pointers bigger than pointers to larger types. Imagine a CPU whose native address points to, say, a 64-bit word; a char* pointer might be composed of a word pointer plus a byte offset.

2.

scanf("%s", c);
printf("%s\n", c);

This is better. c is an array, but in this context an array expression "decays" to a pointer to the array's first element -- which is exactly what scanf with a "%s" format requires. The same thing happens passing c to printf. (But there are still some problems; I'll get to that after the other examples.

3.

scanf("%s", &d);
printf("%s\n", &d);

Since d is a single char* argument, &d is of type char**, and again, you're passing arguments of the wrong type. If all pointers have the same representation (and the same argument-passing mechanism), and the input for the scanf is short enough, this might happen to "work". It treats the char* object as if it were an array of char. If char* is 4 bytes, and the input string is no more than 3 characters long, this will probably work -- as if you had used a char[4] and written the calls correctly. But it's extremely poor practice to store character strings directly into a pointer object, and there's a huge risk of writing past the end of the object, with unpredictable results. (Those unpredictable results include writing into memory that isn't being used for anything else, which could appear to work; such is the nature of undefined behavior.)

(The C standard gives special permission to treat any object as an array of characters, but in this case it's a very bad idea.)

4.

scanf("%s", d);
printf("%s\n", d);

Here the types are all correct, but unless you've initialized d to point to a sufficiently large array of char, it's likely to fail spectacularly (or, worse, appear to work "correctly", which means you've got a subtle bug that will probably show up later).

And now we get to what I mentioned above about other problems.

For example 4, I mentioned that d needs to point to a "sufficiently large" array. How large is "sufficiently large"? There's no answer to that. scanf("%s", ...) reads a whitespace-delimited sequence of characters with no upper bound on its length. If I run your program and hold down the x key, for example, I can provide an input string longer than any buffer you've provided, with unpredictable results (undefined behavior again).

The scanf function's "%s" format cannot be used safely (unless your program runs in an environment where you can control what will appear on the standard input stream).

One good way to read text input is to use fgets to read a line at a time, then use other functions to analyze the result. fgets requires you to specify the maximum length of the input; if the actual input exceeds the limit, it's truncated and left to be read by later calls. It's not quite as convenient as scanf, but it can be done safely. (And never use the gets function; like scanf("%s", ...), it cannot be used safely.)

Suggested reading:

Section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ does an excellent job of explaining C arrays and pointers, and how they're related (and not related). Section 12 discusses C standard I/O.

(I'm sorry this answer is so long; I didn't have time to make it shorter.)

share|improve this answer

You got undefined behavior in cases 3 and 4.

  • Cases one and two are the same, as both pointing to the first element in the array.
  • Case 3 is undefined, as you give a pointer to pointer to char when expecting pointer to char.
  • Case 4 is undefined, as the pointer d is not initialized.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't case 1 give a pointer to a pointer to the first element in the array (i.e., char**) instead of char*? – Ivan Apr 15 '12 at 1:09
1  
No. the address of the array (&array) is the address of the first element. When you just write (array) it decays to a pointer. both are valid. – MByD Apr 15 '12 at 1:10
1  
@BinyaminSharet: No, both are not valid. &array is the address of the whole array. It refers to the same memory address as &array[0], but it's of a different type. It's likely to work on a system where all pointers have the same representation, but the behavior is undefined. – Keith Thompson Apr 15 '12 at 1:42
    
@KeithThompson - You are right. Thanks for pointing that out. – MByD Apr 15 '12 at 1:48

3 works (on many platforms, and with a warning if you turn those on; technically it is undefined behavior) because you're abusing the pointer (treating &d, which is of type (char **), as (char *) and storing characters inside the memory intended for a pointer). 4 dies because the uninitialized pointer points to a random address.

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The important question here is whether there is space in which to store the result.

scanf("%s", &c);
printf("%s\n", &c);

Is there storage? Yes, the address you take is that of the first element of the array. The array exists, so you can put the result there.

scanf("%s", c);
printf("%s\n", c);

Is there storage? Yes. Used like this, the array collapses into a pointer, which is passed same as above.

scanf("%s", &d);
printf("%s\n", &d);

Is there storage? Yes. It's not of the appropriate type, (char **, should be char *), but it shouldn't be any different than casting a char into a pointer type and storing it in a variable declared as a pointer. (Other answers say this is undefined behavior. I don't think it is, casting a char or any other integer type to a char * or other pointer type is well-defined, if ill-advised; show me where the standard says this is undefined.)

scanf("%s", d);
printf("%s\n", d);

Is there storage? Not that you've allocated. It could technically be the case that whatever happens to be in d points to a place in memory that won't segfault. Even if it does, it's not your memory and you could be overwriting something important, or it could change unexpectedly. You haven't told d where to find valid memory to point to, so you're playing pointer Russian roulette.

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The first example has undefined behavior, because scanf requires a char* argument, but it's being given a char (*)[10]. – Keith Thompson Apr 15 '12 at 1:43
    
@KeithThompson And is that not guaranteed to collapse to the address of the first element? Are there compilers where it doesn't? – Kevin Apr 15 '12 at 1:45
    
There is no implicit conversion from char (*)[10] to char*; it's guaranteed not to "collapse" to the address of the first element. It's likely to work if both pointer types happen to have the same size, representation, and argument-passing behavior (though an optimizing compiler could still break it), but the behavior is still undefined. Try compiling the code with gcc. It gives a warning. – Keith Thompson Apr 15 '12 at 1:48
    
Do you know of any architectures where pointers to different types have different sizes or layouts? Much of the C library operates on void *s, is the library just not reliable on such systems? – Kevin Apr 15 '12 at 2:10
    
Yes, I've worked on Cray vector machines where int* is a raw memory address pointing to a 64-bit word, and char* or void* consists of a word address with a 3-bit byte offset stored in the (otherwise unused) high-order 3 bits of the pointer. A similar system might need to store the offset separately, making void* larger than int*. The C library's dependence on void* isn't a problem, as long as the compiler has enough information to know it has to generate a conversion. Passing an incorrect pointer type to scanf doesn't do a conversion; it does type-punning, which can fail. – Keith Thompson Apr 15 '12 at 2:58

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