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Sorry for the stupid post, but I am new to Objective-C programming and Cocoa and have a couple of questions which I can't find the answers to, I'm hoping someone can enlighten me.

Firstly, in XCode, when using the Interface builder, when I want to create a new object I drag the object to my 'assets'. However I can't specify methods or anything without manually creating a new class file. Is there any point using the interface builder's 'object'?

The first app I built to test things with, I put most of the code in the AppDelegate class files. Research has shown me that the AppDelegate's purpose is simply handling application events like launching and closing. Was I wrong in putting the methods in this class? Does it make any difference?

Finally, if I have several class files created, each handling their own functionality with an interface built and linked to the classes, then what do I do with the 'main' file? It seems to me that the 'main' file and 'appdelegate' class files will be for the most case left as-is?

I hope that makes sense. Again i'm sorry for the silly-sounding questions but I can't find any answers.

Thanks in advance everyone!

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3 Answers 3

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Firstly, in XCode, when using the Interface builder, when I want to create a new object I drag the object to my 'assets'. However I can't specify methods or anything without manually creating a new class file.

Sure you can. Just set the class of the object using the inspector.

Note that you can only connect nib objects to an outlet or action. You can't specify any random methods, nor should you—the whole point of the IBOutlet, IBOutletCollection, and IBAction keywords is to declare in code that these properties/methods are used by a nib.

Is there any point using the interface builder's 'object'?

Yes, but pretty rarely. Usually you create objects in code and connect outlets to them.

The application's delegate is one object you may want to create in the MainMenu or MainWindow nib, if you build your application that way (the iOS templates have changed away from it for some reason).

The first app I built to test things with, I put most of the code in the AppDelegate class files. Research has shown me that the AppDelegate's purpose is simply handling application events like launching and closing. Was I wrong in putting the methods in this class?

Probably. The application's delegate generally should only handle business relating to the NS/UIApplicationDelegate protocol.

On the flip side, it's OK to make your root view controller the application's delegate, if it makes sense to do so (and the NS/UIApplicationDelegate implementation code is not too voluminous). The question you have to answer—and only you can answer it for your application—is whether you are making your root view controller the application's delegate or the application's delegate the root view controller. If in doubt, keep them separate.

Does it make any difference?

Long-term, yes. It's very easy, especially in the class of the application's delegate, to create a Big Ball of Mud class—one without well-defined and clearly-delineated responsibilities. Take dynamite to such a class as soon as possible.

Finally, if I have several class files created, each handling their own functionality with an interface built and linked to the classes, then what do I do with the 'main' file? It seems to me that the 'main' file and 'appdelegate' class files will be for the most case left as-is?

Yes. They're boiler-plate.

If you haven't written any code in the application's delegate (or have removed everything you had put there into new and better-delineated classes), such that all that's left are empty method bodies or none at all, you can safely remove the application's delegate. You can always create it again later if you change your mind.

Note that if you delete your application delegate class, you should also change the main.m file—or the MainMenu/MainWindow nib, if you have one—to not refer to it. Your application won't build if your UIApplicationMain call (or any other code) refers to a class that doesn't exist, and it will crash if your MainMenu/MainWindow nib (or any other nib) refers to a class that doesn't exist.

There is no shame in your application having a delegate if you need it to, but if you don't, removing it and the class you were using for it eliminates future temptation to stuff code there or use it to store third-order globals.

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thank you for a very very detailed answer, this is exactly what I was looking for. –  Cristian Apr 16 '12 at 11:31
  1. The point of using objects in interface builder is to connect methods of the object to UI elements.

  2. It partly depends on what your methods are doing, but for the most part the app delegate class is going to be left alone. It isn't an actual requirement (your program will work either way) but it is common practice because it generally creates more maintainable code. The app delegate should just handle the application events ( using other classes to do any complex logic or heavy lifting ).

  3. The 'main' file will most likely not change. I can't think of any reason to do so, but I wouldn't rule it out for some advanced cases.

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To be honest I only used the Object thing in IB once, when I wanted a separate object to have some UI bindings.

About the app delegate and main file, yes, you'll leave them as-is most of the time. But if you try to do something besides test apps you'll need to handle open events to, for example, connect to a server, ask the user for a review, increment some launch counter, etc... Those are just examples!

The main file I advise you to left it alone and use the object oriented tools provided. You should have a view controller hierarchy, isolate your views from the data, and use the view controller to comunicate between view and model. Read about MVC if you want more info on how your application should be organized.

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thanks for the explanation. last question: what do you mean view controller hierarchy? and isolating views? thanks again –  Cristian Apr 15 '12 at 1:21
    
Have a look at the MVC link. But in a nutshell, you should always have a model (for example a class that can be queried for info, stored on your database), a controller (a class that handles user events and that queries the model and set's the info on your views) and a view (that has the drawing code, view hierarchy, etc). The view controller hierarchy is for example TabBarController->TableViewController->InfoController->Edit Controller. It's more like a storyboard, but I like to think of it as a hierarchy. –  fbernardo Apr 15 '12 at 1:27
    
coming from scripting where you throw everything into one file, all this stuff seems awfully confusing. Either way, thanks v much for your detailed answers. –  Cristian Apr 15 '12 at 1:30
    
Keep learning, you'll see all this will actually help you to better organize your code. It will also help you porting it. When you use MVC correctly, replacing/extending the model becomes very easy. –  fbernardo Apr 15 '12 at 1:36
    
last thing, would i be correct in saying that controllers are the objects and methods, and views are the interface you build? –  Cristian Apr 15 '12 at 1:51

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