Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a class Foo in C# that has a string name and I want each one to have a unique name. What I wanted to do is get the name from creating a static int variable and then assigning it to a local instance int variable to which I add to the end of the string. This does not work though, how would I be able to get my desired result.

class Foo
{
    static int count = 0;
    int fooNum;
    string name;

    public Foo
    {
        ++count;
        fooNum = count;
        name = "Foo" + fooNum;
        Console.WriteLine(name);
    }
}

int main()
{
   for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
   {
      Foo test = new Foo();
   }
}

Actual Output: Foo5 Foo5 Foo5 Foo5 Foo5

Desired Output: Foo0 Foo1 Foo2 Foo3 Foo4

Any help would be greatly appreciated

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
you've posted code that doesn't compile... –  Mitch Wheat Apr 15 '12 at 0:52
    
@MitchWheat. "This does not work though"... –  gdoron Apr 15 '12 at 0:52
    
"does not work" does not mean "it does not compile" in my book....By definition it can't work unless it compiles... But it can 'not work' when it compiles also... –  Mitch Wheat Apr 15 '12 at 0:54
    
...especially when "actual output" is attributed to the code. If it doesn't compile, then there's no output. –  spender Apr 15 '12 at 2:18
    
since you have an answer, can I suggest you accept one (when you are able to) and maybe even cast upvotes. –  Mitch Wheat Apr 15 '12 at 4:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code doesn't compile. Correcting it to:

class Foo
{
    static int count = 0;
    int fooNum;
    string name;

    public Foo()
    {
        ++count;
        fooNum = count;
        name = "Foo" + fooNum;
        Console.WriteLine(name);
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        Foo test = new Foo();
    }
}

makes it compile and work like a charm. It prints

Foo1
Foo2
Foo3
Foo4
Foo5
share|improve this answer
    
So I found out why it wasn't incrementing. In my code I have a currentObject holder that only calls the constructor once and then whenever it adds something to a List it just does a shallow copy not calling the constructor. The reason it goes to 1025 (in my code not the example) is because I call the constructor to first init the list. To rectify all of this I have created a function that increments the static variable. Thank you all, I would've kept thinking it wasn't working if you guys didn't show me that I was right. Thanks again all! –  Ryan Leonski Apr 15 '12 at 4:41

Mitch and Tudor have correct examples, but I would still point out why your code doesn't work:

Your code doesn't work because you are missing parentheses on your Foo constructor, which causes the code to not compile. If you are ignoring this compiler error you are probably running a previous build which produces the output you are seeing. Fix the constructor and you'll see that your code will work as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. for taking time to explain –  Mitch Wheat Apr 15 '12 at 4:18

Try collecting your Foos into a generic Collection, such as:

List<Foo> myFooList;

Then as you add in more Foos to your List, you can use the index number to identify it.

share|improve this answer

This code works as expected:

namespace ConsoleApplication68
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
           for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) 
           { 
              Foo test = new Foo();
              Console.WriteLine(test.name); 
           } 
        }
    }

    class Foo 
    { 
        private static int count = 0; 
        public string name; 

        public Foo() 
        { 
            int fooNum = ++count; 
            name = "Foo" + fooNum; 
        } 
    } 
}

Please note that I've moved the Console.WriteLine() to a more correct place in your code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.