Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use a Sieve of Eratosthenes method for finding the largest prime factor of a large number (problem 3 in Project Euler).

My syntax seems to be correct, and i am using Long (not int), but I'm getting the following error message:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: Index: 1, Size: 1
    at java.util.ArrayList.rangeCheck(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.ArrayList.get(Unknown Source)
    at problem3.ProblemThree.Factor(ProblemThree.java:49)
    at problem3.ProblemThree.Recursion(ProblemThree.java:37)
    at problem3.ProblemThree.main(ProblemThree.java:83)

I don't know why this is happening. Could somebody please tell me what I'm doing wrong here?

 package problem3;

 import java.util.List;
 import java.util.ArrayList;

 public class ProblemThree 
 {
    //initializing variables and lists
    long factorNo;
    long nowTesting;
    int i;  
    List<Long> allPrimeList = new ArrayList<Long>();
    List<Long> ourPrimes = new ArrayList<Long>();

    ProblemThree(long x)    //constructor; the input "x" is the number whose highest prime factor is being sought
    {
        factorNo = x;     
    }       

    void initialize()   //use the workaround initialization (add 2 to the allPrimesList, set nowTesting to 3). 
                        //If the factorNo is even, add 2 to the primes list
                        //TODO: need more elegant solution 
    {
        allPrimeList.add((long) 2);
        nowTesting=3;
        if(factorNo % 2 == 0) ourPrimes.add((long) 2);
        i = 0;
    }        

    void recursion()    //keep factoring the next nowTesting until the next nowTesting is greater than half of the factorNo
    {
        while (nowTesting <= (factorNo/2))
        {
            nowTesting = factor(nowTesting);
        }
        System.out.println(ourPrimes);
    }

    long factor(long t) //The factorization algorithm. Lists all the factors of long t
    {
        nowTesting = t;

 // Line 49:
     if ((nowTesting % allPrimeList.get(i)) == 0)
        {
            i = 0;
            return (nowTesting + 2);            
        }
        else
            if(i <= allPrimeList.size()) //if we have not yet reached the end of ourPrimeList
            {
                i++;
                return nowTesting;
            }
            else    //if the end of ourPrimeList has been reached without a single modulus==0, this number is a prime
            {
                allPrimeList.add(nowTesting);

                if(factorNo%nowTesting==0) //if the nowTesting is a prime factor of factorNo, it will be perfectly divisible
                {
                    ourPrimes.add(nowTesting);
                }                    
                i=0;
                return (nowTesting+2);   
            }            
    }

    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        ProblemThree pt = new ProblemThree(600851475143L);
        pt.initialize();
        pt.recursion();
    }
 }
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried looking up what those error messages mean? –  simchona Apr 15 '12 at 1:40
1  
Just to let you know, it's customary for method names to use camelBack and classes to use CapitalizedWords. It's really difficult to parse your code when your method names look like classes. –  Tim Pote Apr 15 '12 at 1:44
    
According to the error message, on line 49 you get the item at index 1 from the allPrimeList array when it only has 1 item in it (at index 0). That's an error. So you need to look back through your logic and determine why you're trying to access an index beyond the end of the array. –  ulmangt Apr 15 '12 at 1:44
    
@Tim Pote : thank you. I've only been coding for a couple of months :) –  monarch Apr 15 '12 at 1:53
    
@ulmangt: thanks, that clarifies things, I will look into this –  monarch Apr 15 '12 at 1:53

3 Answers 3

thank you everyone for patiently wading through my code, I realize that it must have been excruciatingly painful :)

I have just solved the problem. My previous approach seems very complicated in retrospect. This is the final solution I used, quite a bit more elegant, although it still has room for improvement:

//second attempt from the ground up!
package problem3;


public class BiggestPrime 
{
    long lInput;
    long factorTest;
    long currentHeight;
    boolean divided;

    public BiggestPrime(long n)
    {
        factorTest = 2;
        currentHeight = n;

        System.out.println("The prime factors of " + n + " are:"); 

        while (factorTest<currentHeight)
        {
            if (divided == true) {factorTest = 2; divided = false;}
            if (factorTest > currentHeight) {System.out.println("factorTest is greater than currentHeight; breaking"); break;}
            if (currentHeight%factorTest==0)
            {
                System.out.println(factorTest); 
                currentHeight /= factorTest; 
                divided = true;
            } 
            else { factorTest = factorTest + 1L; divided = false;}
        }
        if (factorTest == currentHeight)
        {
            System.out.println(factorTest);
        }
        System.out.println("The end"); 

    }


    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        BiggestPrime bp = new BiggestPrime(600851475143L);
    }

}
share|improve this answer

An interesting approach. Of course, nobody should solve your Euler challenges. But did you know that the second time, you enter 'factor' nowTesting is 3?

// The factorization algorithm. Lists all the factors of long t
long factor (final long nowTesting) 
{
    System.out.println ("entering factor: " + nowTesting);

Minor ideas:

 allPrimeList.add ((long) 2);

can be written:

 allPrimeList.add (2L);

and you pobably recognized the "final" in front of the 'long' parameter in factor? It helps reasoning about code, if you mark everything which isn't changed final. In practise, the consequence is, that your Javacode is cluttered with 'final' modifiers, but that's how it is. It's a sign of good code - maybe not of good design. Final could have been the default.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your tips! –  monarch Apr 17 '12 at 2:22

At line 49, shouldn't you be checking if nowTesting is divisible by i, not the ith element of allPrimes?

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply! –  monarch Apr 17 '12 at 2:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.