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Is there an inbuilt command to do this or has anyone had any luck with a script that does it?

I am looking to get counts of how many records (as defined by a specific EOL such as "^%!") had how many occurrences of a specfic character. (sorted descending by the number of occurrences)

For example, with this sample file:

jdk,|ljn^%!dk,|sn,|fgc^%!
ydfsvuyx^%!67ds5,|bvujhy,|s6d75
djh,|sudh^%!nhjf,|^%!fdiu^%!

Suggested input: delimiter EOL and filename as arguments.

bash/perl some_script_name ",|" "^%!" samplefile

Desired output:

occs    count
3        1
2        1
1        2
0        2

This is because the 1st record had one delimiter, 2nd record had 2, 3rd record had 0, 4th record had 3, 5th record had 1, 6th record had 0.

Bonus pts if you can make the delimiter and EOL argument accept hex input (ie 2C7C) or normal character input (ie ,|) .

share|improve this question
    
Looks like the perfect problem for awk. –  Adam Liss Apr 15 '12 at 3:09
    
Does it have to be perl specifically or anything from the coreutils (it's tagged bash and shell). I believe there is a grep option for this. –  bitmask Apr 15 '12 at 3:10
    
It can be any unix solution that runs on solaris –  toop Apr 15 '12 at 3:12
    
@toop - You didn't like/select any of anwers below. If none of the answers solve your problem, then please update your question, so users can update their answers. –  Ωmega Apr 21 '12 at 13:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is what perl lives for:

#!perl -w
use 5.12.0;

my ($delim, $eol, $file) = @ARGV;

open my $fh, "<$file" or die "error opening $file $!";
$/ = $eol; # input record separator

my %counts;
while (<$fh>) {
    my $matches = () = $_ =~ /(\Q$delim\E)/g; # "goatse" operator
    $counts{$matches}++;
}

say "occs\tcount";
foreach my $num (reverse sort keys %counts) {
    say "$num\t$counts{$num}";
}

(if you haven't got 5.12, remove the "use 5.12" line and replace the say with print)

share|improve this answer
    
this gives me an error: -bash: !": event not found –  toop Apr 15 '12 at 4:16
    
Ignore the above comment. Why are there 3 counts for the 0 occurrence. I think only ydfsvuyx and fdiu match this. –  toop Apr 15 '12 at 4:25
    
well, it depends on what you mean by "record", there's an empty one at the end of the file (after the final ^%!). –  Alex Apr 15 '12 at 9:02
    
i guess i define ^%! to be the end of the record. So anything after the final ^%! should not be counted –  toop Apr 15 '12 at 9:43

Script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;

$/ = $ARGV[1];
open my $fh, '<', $ARGV[2] or die $!;
my @records = <$fh> and close $fh;

$/ = $ARGV[0];
my %counts;
$counts{(split $_)-1}++ for @records;
delete $counts{-1};

print "$_\t$counts{$_}\n" for (reverse sort keys %counts);

Test:

perl script.pl ',|' '^%!' samplefile 

Output:

3   1
2   1
1   2
0   2
share|improve this answer

A solution in awk:

BEGIN {
    RS="\\^%!"
    FS=",\\|"
    max_occ = 0
} 
{
    if(match($0, "^ *$")) {  # This is here to deal with the final separator.
        next
    }

    if(NF - 1 > max_occ) {
        max_occ = NF - 1
    }
    count[NF - 1]=count[NF - 1] + 1
}
END {
    printf("occs    count\n")
    for(i = 0; i <= max_occ; i++) {
        printf("%s    %s\n", i, count[i])
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Well, there's one more empty record at the end of the file which has 0. So, here's a script to do what you wanted. Adding headers and otherwise tweaking the printf output is left as an excercise for you. :)

Basically, read the whole file in, split it into records, and for each record, use a /g regex to count the sub-delimiters. Since /g returns an array of all matches, use @{[]} to make an arrayref then deref that in scalar context to get a count. There has to be a more elegant solution to that particular part of the problem, but whatever; it's perl line noise. ;)

user@host[/home/user]
$ ./test.pl ',|' '^%!' test.in
3   1
2   1
1   2
0   3
user@host[/home/user]
$ cat test.in
jdk,|ljn^%!dk,|sn,|fgc^%!
ydfsvuyx^%!67ds5,|bvujhy,|s6d75
djh,|sudh^%!nhjf,|^%!fdiu^%!
user@host[/home/user]
$ cat test.pl
#!/usr/bin/perl

my( $subdelim, $delim, $in,) = @ARGV;
$delim = quotemeta $delim;
$subdelim = quotemeta $subdelim;
my %counts;

open(F, $in) or die qq{Failed opening $in: $?\n};
foreach( split(/$delim/, join(q{}, <F>)) ){
  $counts{ scalar(@{[m/.*?($subdelim)/g]}) }++;
}
printf( qq{%i% 4i\n}, $_, $counts{$_} ) foreach (sort {$b<=>$a} keys %counts);

And here's a modified version which only keeps fields which contain at least one non-space character. That removes the last field, but also has the consequence of removing any other empty fields. It also uses $/ and \Q\E to reduce a couple of explicit function calls (thank, Alex). And, like the previous one, it works with strict + warnings;

#!/usr/bin/perl

my( $subdelim, $delim, $in ) = @ARGV;
local $/=$delim;

my %counts;
open(F, $in) or die qq{Failed opening $in: $?\n};
foreach ( grep(/\S/, <F>) ){
  $counts{ scalar(@{[m/.*?(\Q$subdelim\E)/g]}) }++;
}
printf( qq{%i% 4i\n}, $_, $counts{$_} ) foreach (sort {$b<=>$a} keys %counts);

If you really only want to remove the last record unconditionally, I'm partial to using pop:

#!/usr/bin/perl

my( $subdelim, $delim, $in ) = @ARGV;
local $/=$delim;

my %counts;
open(F, $in) or die qq{Failed opening $in: $?\n};
my @lines = <F>;
pop @lines;
$counts{ scalar(@{[m/.*?(\Q$subdelim\E)/g]}) }++ foreach (@lines);
printf( qq{%i% 4i\n}, $_, $counts{$_} ) foreach (sort {$b<=>$a} keys %counts);
share|improve this answer
    
Why are there 3 counts for the 0 occurrence? I think only ydfsvuyx and fdiu match this. –  toop Apr 15 '12 at 4:25
    
Empty record at the end of the file. If you define a record as only being between record separators, then you'd need a separator at the beginning of the file as well. –  dannysauer Apr 15 '12 at 14:29
    
There, I added two solutions which remove all empty fields or just everything after the last record separator, respectively. And used the actual record separator variable like I should've to begin with (my excuse is that it was late; thanks for the reminder, @Alex and @stackoverflow) –  dannysauer Apr 15 '12 at 14:59

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