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I am accessing a dispatched notification like so:

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(handleUnpresent:) name:UNPRESENT_VIEW object:nil];

...

-(void)handleUnpresent:(NSNotification *)note;
{
    NSLog(@"%@", note.object.footer);
    //property 'footer' not found on object of type 'id'
}

Some of the incoming note.object objects have a "footer" and some don't. However, I don't want to go through to trouble of making a class that only has a property called footer just to make this work. I even tried ((NSObject *)note.object).footer) which works in some languages, but apparently not obj-c. What can I do?

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Why not go to the trouble? ObjC classes are fairly lightweight compared to most languages, and it would allow you to compare the footer property to nil. –  CodaFi Apr 15 '12 at 4:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Checking the isKindOfClass is certainly the more robust option. However, if you have multiple unrelated classes that return the property you need, there is another way: respondsToSelector. Just ask if the object has a footer method, and you can safely call it.

-(void)handleUnpresent:(NSNotification *)note;
{
    id noteObject = [note object];
    if ([note respondsToSelector:@selector(footer)])
    {
        NSLog(@"Footer = %@", [noteObject footer]);
    }
}

That respondsToSelector method is powerful and handy in the right places, but don't go wild with it. Also, it can't tell you anything about the return type, so the footer you get may not be of the class you were expecting.

The syntax for noteObject.footer and [noteObject footer] are easy to treat as equivalent. However, when the class of noteObject is unknown, the compiler will accept the latter but not the former. If noteObject has a defined class that doesn't usually respond to footer, it will give a warning, but still compile and run. In these cases, it is your responsibility to guarantee that the method will indeed exist when needed, and therefore that the method call won't crash at run time.

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If the object passed in the notification may be one of a number of classes and you don't want to cast the object to a specific class you can use performSelector: to call the footer method on the object. If you wrap this call with a respondsToSelector: you'll avoid an exception if the object turns out not to have a footer method.

-(void)handleUnpresent:(NSNotification *)note;
{
    if ([[note object] respondsToSelector:@selector(footer)]) {
        NSString *footer = [[note object] performSelector:@selector(footer)];

        NSLog(@"%@", footer);
    }
}

Using performSelector will stop the compiler complaining that the method "'footer' not found on object of type 'id'."

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NSObject doesn't have any property named footer, which is why the compiler is complaining. Casting an id back to an NSObject doesn't help. If you know the object is always going to be some custom object you've created, you can cast back to that and then call footer and the compiler won't complain. It's best to actually check tho. See the example below (for the example, I named the class that has the footer property ViewWithFooter, so rename appropriately):

- (void)handleUnpresent:(NSNotification*)note
{
  ViewWithFooter view = (ViewWithFooter*)[note object];
  NSParameterAssert([view isKindOfClass:[ViewWithFooter class]]);
  UIView* footer = [view footer];
  // Do something with the footer...
  NSLog(@"Footer: %@", footer);
}

If you have a bunch of unrelated classes (i.e., not in the same class hierarchy) that all present a footer property, you'd be best served creating a protocol with the required footer property and casting the object to the protocol in the code example above and asserting it responds to the -footer selector.

Here's an example using the protocol:

@protocol ViewWithFooter <NSObject>

- (UIView*)footer; // this could also be a readonly property, or whatever

@end

- (void)handleUnpresent:(NSNotification*)note
{
  id<ViewWithFooter> view = (id<ViewWithFooter>)[note object];
  NSParameterAssert([view respondsToSelector:@selector(footer)]);
  UIView* footer = [view footer];
  // Do something with the footer...
  NSLog(@"Footer: %@", footer);
}
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for curiosity sake, is there any way to bypass using a class by using something like ((id *)note.object).footer in a way that the compiler won't be mad? –  Jackson Apr 15 '12 at 4:52
    
Bypass? Properties require explicit declaration. (also, to be pedantic, id is already a pointer). –  CodaFi Apr 15 '12 at 5:18
    
You could use [[note object] performSelector:@selector(footer)]. The compiler won't complain about this but if footer is not implemented you'll get the usual EXC_BAD_ACCESS. If you wrap the call to performSelector in a respondsToSelector conditional you'll be covered. –  mttrb Apr 15 '12 at 5:29
    
@Jackson Just make a protocol and cast it to that. I'll add the protocol example to the answer. –  Jason Coco Apr 15 '12 at 6:56

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