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I have str1 and str2 below, and I want to use just one regexp which will match both. In case of str1, I also want to be able to capture the number of QSFP ports

>>> str1='''4 48 48-port and 6 QSFP 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LC''' 
>>> str2='''4 48 48-port 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LC''' 
>>> 

I want to be able to capture the numbers "4", "48", "6" (if present), and "7548". But I am unable to capture "6" using the "?" metacharacter.

When I do not use a metacharacter, the capture works for str1, but then I can use this regex because it wont work for str2:

>>> re.search(r'^(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+.*(?:(\d+)\s+QSFP).*\s+(\d+)S-LC', str1, re.I|re.M).group(3) 
'6' 
>>>

It works even when I use the "+" to indicate one occurrence, but again, this wont work for str2:

>>> re.search(r'^(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+.*(?:(\d+)\s+QSFP)+.*\s+(\d+)S-LC', str1, re.I|re.M).group(3) 
'6' 
>>>

When I use "?" to match for 0 or 1 occurrence, the capture fails even for str1:

>>> re.search(r'^(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+.*(?:(\d+)\s+QSFP)?.*\s+(\d+)S-LC', str1, re.I|re.M).group(3) 
>>>
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1  
Combining quantifiers like that is meaningless ("0 or more copies of 1 or more copies of \d"). What are you really trying to do? –  geekosaur Apr 15 '12 at 4:38
    
I think re.search(r'(\d+)', str1).group(0) is sufficient. –  RanRag Apr 15 '12 at 4:39
    
I want to capture the decimal value IF it appears in 'str1', but I do not want the regex to fail if there is no decimal value. So what I really want is for this below to capture the decimal value: re.search(r'(\d+)?', str1).group(1) –  Sanjay BM Apr 15 '12 at 4:42
    
Leftmost matching means that \d* (and similar quantifiers that permit empty-string matches) will never find the digits unless they're at the beginning of the string. Your best bet is to use conditional logic outside of the regular expression. –  Mark Reed Apr 15 '12 at 4:59
1  
I'm confused. You state you 'also want to capture the number of QSFP ports', but according to your example regexes, are you catching anything other than the QSFP value? –  hexparrot Apr 15 '12 at 5:35

4 Answers 4

My interpretation of the problem was that OP wanted a regex that will match for both strings, and return the number in .group(1) if it exists (as it does in str1). I believe the issue was that he/she was not able to both capture the '6' in str1 and also match str2.

I got this from some quick trial and error:

>>> str1='''4 48 48-port and 6 QSFP 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LC''' 
>>> str2='''4 48 48-port 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LC''' 
>>> re.search(r'^4\s+48\s+.*(?:(\d+)\s+QSFP)|.*-LC', str1, re.I|re.M).group(1)
'6'
>>> re.search(r'^4\s+48\s+.*(?:(\d+)\s+QSFP)|.*-LC', str2, re.I|re.M).group(1)
>>> # no error returned, implying a match was found.

The difference is that I "or" the non-capturing parens with .*

Unfortunately, this makes the regex even more difficult to understand, but maybe it will work for you.

(edited for completeness)

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I am not sure exactly what your requirement is.

Is it something like this:

>>> str1 = "hello 12 world"
>>> str2 =  "hello world"
>>> obj = re.search(r'(\d+)',str1)
>>> obj.group(0)
'12'

Now checking in str2 which is not containing any decimal value.

>>> obj = re.search(r'(\d+)',str2)
>>> if obj is not None:
...     print obj.group(0)
... else:
...     print "not found"
...
not found
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
I was trying to simplify my question and now I see the confusion it could create. This is what I need: I have str1 and str2 below, and I want to use just one regexp which will match both. For str1, I want to capture number of QSFP ports >>> str1='''4 48 48-port and 6 QSFP 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LC''' >>> str2='''4 48 48-port 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LC''' >>> >>> re.search(r'^4\s+48\s+.*(?:(\d+)\s+QSFP).*-LC', str1, re.I|re.M).group(1) '6' >>> >>> re.search(r'^4\s+48\s+.*(?:(\d+)\s+QSFP)?.*-LC', str1, re.I|re.M).group(1) >>> –  Sanjay BM Apr 15 '12 at 5:06
    
@user1334085: please include this comment in your original question. –  RanRag Apr 15 '12 at 5:08
    
@user1334085: and what is the desired output for str2 –  RanRag Apr 15 '12 at 5:19

I want to be able to capture the numbers "4", "48", "6" (if present), and "7548". But I am unable to capture "6" using the "?" metacharacter.

You can simplify your life if you avoid regex, since your query is very simple.

str1='''4 48 48-port and 6 QSFP 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LC'''
str2='''4 48 48-port 10GigE Linecard 7548S-LC'''
lines = [str1,str2]
nums = []
for l in lines:
    r = []
    bits = l.split()
    last_num = bits.pop()[:-4]
    _ = [r.append(i) for i in bits if i.isdigit()]
    r.append(last_num)
    nums.append(r)

>>> nums
[['4', '48', '6', '7548'], ['4', '48', '7548']]
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I think the problem is that the .* is eating up the QSFP bit, and because of the ? there's no incentive for it to ever backtrack. Changing the .* to a non-greedy .*? (surprisingly -- to me at least) didn't help. Moving the .* inside the non-capturing group does help, however:

>>> re.match(r'^4\s+48\s+(?:.*(\d+)\s+QSFP)?.*-LC', str1, re.I|re.M).group(1)
'6'
>>> re.match(r'^4\s+48\s+(?:.*(\d+)\s+QSFP)?.*-LC', str2, re.I|re.M).group(1)
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Cool!!! That solved my problem. I had initially tried .*? to make it non-greedy and it had not worked to my surprise too. But your solution works perfectly. Thanks. –  Sanjay BM Apr 15 '12 at 6:17

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