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This code is throwing the exception, "Index was outside the bounds of the array". Shouldn't this simply add each of the split data into the designated array slot?

while (input != null)
{
    string[] splitInput = inputLine.Split();
    EmpNum = int.Parse(splitInput[0]);
    EmpName = (splitInput[1]);
    EmpAdd = (splitInput[2]);
    EmpWage = double.Parse(splitInput[3]);
    EmpHours = double.Parse(splitInput[4]);
    inputLine = (myFile.ReadLine());
    Console.WriteLine("test {0},{1},{2}", EmpNum, EmpWage, EmpHours);
}

To clarify a bit, I am reading data from a simple text file that has employee data (name, address, hours, employee number, wages).

I've added my entire main method for clarity.

using System;
using System.IO;

class Program
{
static void Main()
{

    //declare an array of employees
    Employee[] myEmployees = new Employee[10];

    //declare other variables
    string inputLine;
    string EmpName;
    int EmpNum;
    double EmpWage;
    double EmpHours;
    string EmpAdd;

    //declare filepath
    string environment =            System.Environment.GetFolderPath(System.Environment.SpecialFolder.Personal) + "\\";

    //get input
    Console.Write("\nEnter a file name in My Documents: ");
    string input = Console.ReadLine();
    string path = environment + input;
    Console.WriteLine("Opening the file...");

    //read file
    StreamReader myFile = new StreamReader(path);
    inputLine = (myFile.ReadLine());

    //split input
    while (inputLine != null)
    {

        string[] splitInput = inputLine.Split();
        EmpNum = int.Parse(splitInput[0]);
        EmpName = (splitInput[1]);
        EmpAdd = (splitInput[2]);
        EmpWage = double.Parse(splitInput[3]);
        EmpHours = double.Parse(splitInput[4]);
        Console.WriteLine("test {0},{1},{2}", EmpNum, EmpWage, EmpHours);
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}//End Main()
}//End class Program
share|improve this question
    
Also, if any other information is required, I can post more of my code. – xavi Apr 15 '12 at 5:28
    
when you split your inputLine you get less then 5 elements – bjarneh Apr 15 '12 at 5:30
    
Shouldn't while (input != null) instead be while (inputLine != null)? – Tyler Treat Apr 15 '12 at 5:30
    
also, when the exception is thrown, you can look at the stack trace and see what line of code it happened - often times this quickly tells you what went wrong.. – Aaron Anodide Apr 15 '12 at 5:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe this version will be good for extra credit :) Seriously though I'm not trying to show off here - it's just that even though it's a learning example, if you get a job and are given the task to write code that reads a CSV file, for instance, you don't want it to crash and make you look bad so you'll do yourself a favor to know about some steps to make it more robust.

Note - this is not an attempt to start a debate on the perfect way to code your example - just trying to show a few tricks that I know are helpful. Hope it does help.

            StreamReader myFile = new StreamReader("TextFile1.txt");
            int lineNumber = 0;
            while (!myFile.EndOfStream)
            {
                // Read the next line.
                string inputLine = myFile.ReadLine();
                lineNumber++;

                // Extract fields line.
                string[] splitInput = inputLine.Split();

                // Make sure the line has the correct number of fields.
                if (splitInput.Length == 5)
                {
                    // Parse and validate each field.

                    if (!int.TryParse(splitInput[0], out EmpNum))
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("could not parse int " + splitInput[0] + " on line " + lineNumber);
                        continue;
                    }

                    EmpName = (splitInput[1]);

                    EmpAdd = (splitInput[2]);

                    if(!double.TryParse(splitInput[3], out EmpWage))
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("could not parse double " + " on line " + lineNumber);
                        continue;
                    }

                    EmpHours = double.Parse(splitInput[4]);

                    if (!double.TryParse(splitInput[4], out EmpHours))
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("could not parse double: " + " on line " + lineNumber);
                        continue;
                    }

                    // Output
                    Console.WriteLine("test {0},{1},{2}", EmpNum, EmpWage, EmpHours);
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Expecting 5 items from split opertation but got " + splitInput.Length  + " on line " + lineNumber);
                }
            }
            myFile.Close();

TextFile1.txt

1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 f9 10
11 12

Program Output

test 1,5,5
could not parse double:  on line 2
Expecting 5 items from split opertation but got 2 on line 3
share|improve this answer
    
thank you! this is beautiful – xavi Apr 15 '12 at 6:25
    
glad to help... – Aaron Anodide Apr 15 '12 at 6:31

You have a line that doesn't contain enough items. Check the length of the array before reading the items:

string[] splitInput = inputLine.Split();
if (splitInput.Length >= 5) {
  EmpNum = int.Parse(splitInput[0]);
  EmpName = (splitInput[1]);
  EmpAdd = (splitInput[2]);
  EmpWage = double.Parse(splitInput[3]);
  EmpHours = double.Parse(splitInput[4]);
} else {
  // not enough items - show an error message or something
}

Also, you are checking the variable input instead of inputLine in the where, but that's not the cause of the error that you get. If you read to the end of the file, you would get a null reference exception when trying to use the null reference in the split.

share|improve this answer

Check your string you may not be getting 5 elements in input and provide some character in split method

Change the inputLine.Split() to inputLine.Split(','), if you are separating element by comma

your input will be like "first", "second", "third", "forth", "fifth"

share|improve this answer
    
I'm starting to realize my mistake. Ok. So I have created a class called "Employee" and i've created an array of 10 of these employee objects. What I really need to do is read data from this file and store the references in this array of employee objects. Hope this clears things up. – xavi Apr 15 '12 at 5:59
    
repeat this pattern in file and make 5 lines "first", "second", "third", "forth", "fifth" then read file for input you can find how to read from file here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228592(v=vs.80).aspx – Adil Apr 15 '12 at 6:06

Add a break point the line after you split the input, then you can mouse over the resulting array and click the plus sign. This way you can see exactly how the data is being split. This is especially helpful if there are hidden characters that throw off the split (\n,\t,\r).

share|improve this answer

You have a few problems. The first problem is that Split(). You need to change inputLine.Split() to inputLine.Split(','). Right now you are calling into the overload of System.String.Split(params char[]) and since you are not specifying any characters to split, it will return the entire string.

The other issues (as an CS student), you should really work on your naming conventions and error checking. The code is rather brittle and will break very easily. You should start early on learning good software engineering practices and writing high quality code.

using (FileStream fstream = new FileStream("path", FileMode.Open))
using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fstream)) {
    string line;

    while (!reader.EndOfStream && (line = reader.ReadLine()) != null) {
        string[] data = line.Split(',');

        if (data.Length < 5) {
            // You will have IndexOutOfRange issues
            continue; // skip processing the current loop
        }

        int employeeNumber;
        string employeeName;
        string employeeAddress;
        double employeeWage;
        double employeeHours;

        // Will be used to check validity of fields that require parsing into a type.
        bool valid;

        valid = int.TryParse(data[0], out employeeNumber);

        if (!valid) {
            // employee number is not parsable
        }

        employeeName = data[1];
        employeeAddress = data[2];

        valid = double.TryParse(data[3], out employeeWage);

        if (!valid) {
            // employee wage is not parsable
        }

        valid = double.TryParse(data[4], out employeeHours);

        if (!valid) {
            // employee hours are not parsable
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestions! – xavi Apr 15 '12 at 6:15
    
also, could you possibly explain the valid bool? i appreciate your answer! – xavi Apr 15 '12 at 6:24
    
It is to check for malformed data. double.Parse will throw an exception if your data is malformed. Let's say your data file accidentally contains a - character (common after inputting 0's). double.Parse would fail and throw an exception. The solution is to use double.TryParse which returns true if the input was converted to double successfully, otherwise returns false if there was an error (your data was malformed). This prevents an exception from being thrown, and allows you to handle the problem gracefully in code. – David Anderson - DCOM Apr 15 '12 at 6:41

1) Shouldn't the input be inputLine ?

2)Add a null check for every array element before using it.

Also I guess,

while (input != null)
    {
        string[] splitInput = inputLine.Split();
        EmpNum = int.Parse(splitInput[0]);
        EmpName = (splitInput[1]);
        EmpAdd = (splitInput[2]);
        EmpWage = double.Parse(splitInput[3]);
        EmpHours = double.Parse(splitInput[4]);
        inputLine = (myFile.ReadLine());
        Console.WriteLine("test {0},{1},{2}", EmpNum, EmpWage, EmpHours);
    }

should be

while (input != null)
    {
        inputLine = (myFile.ReadLine());
        string[] splitInput = inputLine.Split();
        EmpNum = int.Parse(splitInput[0]);
        EmpName = (splitInput[1]);
        EmpAdd = (splitInput[2]);
        EmpWage = double.Parse(splitInput[3]);
        EmpHours = double.Parse(splitInput[4]);

        Console.WriteLine("test {0},{1},{2}", EmpNum, EmpWage, EmpHours);

}

First read from the file using inputLine = (myFile.ReadLine()); and then perform the split operation...

3) As suggested by @Aaron Anodide, adding a check for length should do the trick..

something like..

inputLine = (myFile.ReadLine());
string[] splitInput = inputLine.Split();
if(splitInput!=null && splitInput.length ==5)
{
 EmpNum = int.Parse(splitInput[0]);
        EmpName = (splitInput[1]);
        EmpAdd = (splitInput[2]);
        EmpWage = double.Parse(splitInput[3]);
        EmpHours = double.Parse(splitInput[4]);
        Console.WriteLine("test {0},{1},{2}", EmpNum, EmpWage, EmpHours);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
how would you feel about adding to your answer a check on the array length after the split operation? I think that'd be helpful for the poster... – Aaron Anodide Apr 15 '12 at 5:36
    
Checking for null values in the array doesn't help at all. There won't ever be any null values in the array. – Guffa Apr 15 '12 at 5:51
    
@Guffa: You mean array or array elements?. If you referring to splitInput!=null, then I have added it just to be on the safer side before using the property. If you are referring to array elements, then say if a line in a file contains only 3 elements, won't the other elements be null? – Shashank Kadne Apr 15 '12 at 5:56
    
@ShashankKadne: I mean this: "2)Add a null check for every array element before using it." If a line contains only 3 items, then you get an array with three items, there are no extra null items added in the array. Also, checking the length of the string before splitting doesn't help either, you have to check the length of the array after splitting. – Guffa Apr 15 '12 at 6:00
    
Yeah I got u...stupid me..! – Shashank Kadne Apr 15 '12 at 6:00

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